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Fellowships, Prizes, & Grants
Funding Opportunities for Students

Applications for ILAS 2022 Summer Funding Opportunities for students pursuing research or an internship in Latin America are now open. Applications and Guidelines Here

 



Charles Koch Foundation offers dissertation support grants for PhD students whose research agendas focus on U.S. foreign policy, U.S. grand strategy, and America’s role in the world. The link to that call for proposals can be found here: https://charleskochfoundation.org/grants/u-s-foreign-policy-dissertations/

We would also like to note our other foreign policy RFPs posted on the CKF website. We are especially interested in proposals pertaining to managing the US-China relationship in both the trade and security dimensions. A complete list of those RFPs is available here: https://charleskochfoundation.org/focus-areas/foreign-policy/

While we anticipate these RFPs being open long-term, we do reassess our priorities on an annual basis. All open RFPs from our organization can always be found on this webpage: https://charleskochfoundation.org/partner-with-us/

Center for Science and Society Course Development Grants for Co-teaching, Columbia University

Rolling Deadline. Lecturers and tenured/tenure-track faculty at Columbia University are encouraged to submit proposals for co-taught courses in “science and society” for undergraduates and graduate students. Courses must be led by one instructor from a STEM field and one instructor from a non-STEM discipline. The Center will provide financial and administrative support. 

Apply Now

In order to further Society for Historians of the Early American
Republic’s mission to foster research on “the rich complexity and
enduring significance of the early American republic,” SHEAR will offer
four research fellowships to scholars examining Latinx, Indigenous,
Asian American, Pacific Island, and/or African diasporic history from
1776 to 1861. We are now seeking applications from interested scholars.

These fellowships may be used for research travel and/or purchasing
microfilm, books, or other research-related materials. Fellows will
receive $3000 at the beginning of the fellowship for their research
expenses. The following year fellows will receive support to travel to
present their research at the SHEAR annual conference. Scholars who are
from underrepresented backgrounds, early in their careers (graduate
students or recent post-graduates), and/or contingent faculty are
strongly encouraged to apply for a fellowship.

Interested scholars should submit a cover letter, CV, a one to two-page
summary of their research project and plans, and a brief explanation of
how the fellowship funds will be used in a single file. Applications are
due February 1, 2021 to fellowships@shear.org.


Apply: Mary Jaharis Center Grants 2022– 2023

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is pleased to announce its 2022–2023 grant competition. 

*** NEW *** Mary Jaharis Center Co-Funding Grants promote Byzantine studies in North America. These grants provide co-funding to organize scholarly gatherings (e.g., workshops, seminars, small conferences) in North America that advance scholarship in Byzantine studies broadly conceived. We are particularly interested in supporting convenings that build diverse professional networks that cross the boundaries of traditional academic disciplines, propose creative approaches to fundamental topics in Byzantine studies, or explore new areas of research or methodologies. 

Mary Jaharis Center Dissertation Grants are awarded to advanced graduate students working on Ph.D. dissertations in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. These grants are meant to help defray the costs of research-related expenses, e.g., travel, photography/digital images, microfilm. 

Mary Jaharis Center Publication Grants support book-length publications or major articles in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. Grants are aimed at early career academics. Preference will be given to postdocs and assistant professors, though applications from non-tenure track faculty and associate and full professors will be considered. We encourage the submission of first-book projects. 

Mary Jaharis Center Project Grants support discrete and highly focused professional projects aimed at the conservation, preservation, and documentation of Byzantine archaeological sites and monuments dated from 300 CE to 1500 CE primarily in Greece and Turkey. Projects may be small stand-alone projects or discrete components of larger projects. Eligible projects might include archeological investigation, excavation, or survey; documentation, recovery, and analysis of at risk materials (e.g., architecture, mosaics, paintings in situ); and preservation (i.e., preventive measures, e.g., shelters, fences, walkways, water management) or conservation (i.e., physical hands-on treatments) of sites, buildings, or objects. 

The application deadline for all grants is February 1, 2022. For further information, please visit the Mary Jaharis Center website: https://maryjahariscenter.org/grants

Contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center, with any questions. 


Applications for Summer 2022 and Academic Year 2022-2023 Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships are now open. The deadline to submit an application is Thursday, February 10th, 2022 at 1:00 pm ETClick here to apply!

FLAS fellowships are open to eligible BA, MA, and PhD students at Columbia and its affiliated institutions who are pursuing training in modern foreign languages and related area or international studies. At Columbia, FLAS fellowships for East Asian languages and studies are administered by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute with funding from the U.S. Department of Education. As such, these awards are contingent upon the availability of federal funding. 

Want to learn more? Join us for a virtual information session next Monday, December 13th at 12:00 pm ET. Click here to register. 

More information about the FLAS fellowship, including application and eligibility requirements, is also available on the Institute’s FLAS and FLAS FAQs pages. 


About WEAI Fellowships
The Weatherhead East Asian Institute offers funding for research, language acquisition, unpaid internships, and dissertation write-up during the summer and academic year to selected Columbia undergraduate and graduate students committed to professional and academic engagement with East and Southeast Asia. Eligibility varies depending on the particular funding opportunity. For more information about available fellowship opportunities as well as application and eligibility requirements, please visit the Institute’s funding page
 
WEAI fellowship applications will be available here beginning on Friday, January 21, 2022, and will close on Friday, March 11, 2022 at 5:00 pm ET.
About the FLAS Fellowship
Administered through Columbia’s Weatherhead East Asian Institute with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, FLAS fellowships are designed to provide financial support to eligible BA, MA, and Ph.D. students (both current and prospective) from Columbia and its affiliated institutions (including Barnard and Teachers College) for participation in modern foreign language and related area studies training during the summer and/or academic year.
FLAS applications are available NOW through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Fellowships Application Portal. The deadline to submit an application is Thursday, February 10th, 2022 at 1:00 pm ET

The International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST), is happy to invite submissions to its seventh DHST Dissertation prize, awarding promising young scholars in the broad field of the history of science and technology.

Initiated at the 22nd International Congress of History of Science in 2005 held in Beijing, IUHPST/DHST now awards the prize every two years. Up to three awards for recent Ph.D. historians of science and technology will recognize outstanding doctoral dissertations completed and filed between 1 September 2020 and 1 September 2022.

The Prize does not specify distinct categories, but submissions must be on the history of science, technology, or medicine. The Award Committee endeavors to maintain the broadest coverage of subjects, geographical areas, chronology and civilizations (African, North American, South American, Asian, Islamic, Western and Ancient Civilizations, and others not included in this list).

Prizes consist of a certificate, waiver of registration fees, assistance with travel and accommodation expenditures to the 27th DHST Congress at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, in 2025. The winner of a prize whose dissertation engages substantially with Islamic science and culture (over competitions seven (2020-2022) and eight (2022-2024), is also awarded the İhsanoğlu Prize funded by the Turkish Society of History of Science.”

A list of previous winners and their projects may be found on the DHST web page at: http://dhstweb.org/awards/dhst-dissertation-prize

AWARD COMMITTEE: The Award Committee includes DHST Council members and distinguished subject specialists.

COMPETITION CALENDAR: Applications open 10 July 2022 and close 1 October 2022 (22:00, GMT). Announcement of prize winners for the seventh competition in early 2023. An award ceremony for winners of competition 7 and 8 is planned at the 27th International Congress of History of Science and Technology to take place in Dunedin, New Zealand in 2025.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE:

In order to apply, the following pdf documents should be sent by mail to DHST president Marcos Cueto (marcos.cueto@fiocruz.br):

– the dissertation. Submissions in any language are welcome.

– a summary of the dissertation in English (maximum 20 double-spaced pages)

– A recommendation letter from the PhD supervisor (at most 3 pages) assessing the dissertation and its historiographical significance. The letter is confidential and should be sent separately by the supervisor.

The e-mails accompanying these documents should specify in the subject line: ‘DHST Dissertation Prize-2023” followed by the last name of the candidate as in this format: ‘DHST Dissertation Prize-2023-Last Name’.

Call for Abstracts, Proposals, & Papers
MJLS’ inaugural issue on the theme of Sovereignty, States, and Inclusion asks writers and reviewers to think critically about the meaning of both sovereignty and the state, broadly conceived. We are interested in how these concepts operate in the present and how they developed and transformed historically. Submissions should recognize that no state is a monolith, and that we often cannot understand states to act in a neat, unilateral, top-down manner. Exploring different dynamics of power and the relationship between various aspects of states, public rights, and identities may also reveal inflection points, helping us to make sense of the past and of our own turbulent times. 
The Michigan Journal of Law & Society is the nation’s first law-school journal to focus on the intersections of law, history, and the social sciences. MJLS is also the nation’s first law-school journal to incorporate law students, PhD students, and a faculty editorial board into its review and editorial processes. 
MJLS’ faculty editorial board consists of thirteen members spanning multiple disciplines, such as Heather Ann Thompson, Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan and Pulitzer Prize winning author of Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy; William Novak, Charles F. and Edith J. Clyne Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School and author of The People’s Welfare: Law and Regulation in Nineteenth-Century America; and Sandy Levitsky, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan, author of Caring for Our Own: Why There Is No Political Demand for New American Social Welfare Rights. 

 As always, please email me or mjls.execs@umich.edu if you have any questions.


We are pleased to announce that EPOCH, the postgraduate history magazine supported by the History Department at Lancaster University, is accepting proposals for upcoming issues. We welcome submissions from all disciplines provided that the topic has a historical foundation. We publish postgraduate research in a friendly format, aiming to make academic history accessible. Our goal is to give postgraduates and early careerists a platform to showcase their work and to engage with wider audiences worldwide. You can find the full set of submission guidelines and common questions on our website.  

Our issues under development pursue the themes of food and travel, violence and conflict, and material culture; although, we are happy to accept proposals on any topic. We are also currently looking for reviews on popular books, films, television series, and video games that have a historical slant. 

Please reach out if you have any further questions, and we look forward to hearing from you. 

Meredith Guthrie
Coordinating Editor, Medieval Specialist, and PhD Candidate
Web: https://www.epoch-magazine.com/
Twitter: @HistoryEpoch


CALL FOR PAPERS
History in the Making 2022

“Pandemic at the Disco: Bodies, Disruptions, Transformations”

Isolated in our homes, we watched as the world unfolded. Our bodies became strange sanctuaries, our
homes forced shelter from disaster and sickness. Masks and sanitizers protected us, unrealized medicines
brought us future comfort tinged with fear from an invisible intrusion.
As the pandemic unfurled and a forced normalcy emerged, this new reality demanded time to ask
ourselves “what has unfolded?” Awoken with a start, we opened our eyes to a new and strange world, one
of barriers between one another, separating a collective ensemble. Our cities fell silent. The shops and all
else deemed unessential shuttered. The cultural pulse paused.
There’s a bull in the china shop, a Trojan Horse at the gates. There’s a pandemic at the disco!
International borders are growing more defined and outsiders seen more alien while misinformation
floods our media channels. The right wing ideologies seize influence worldwide as the left as we know it
evolves unrecognizable.
Environmental degradation is apparent worldwide, some regions crumbling, alternately drying up or
flooding, bursting into flame. Gentrification appears a force unstoppable, while some, working remotely,
struggle with deep loneliness and isolation, grocery delivery kids and Uber Eats drivers the new superhero
and sole distanced social interaction. Are we mere bodies within the unrelenting grasp of a homogeneous
corporate power that keeps us chained to our desks even in our own properties? Politicians on the 6
o’clock news make false promises and shake hands with doom. But in our homes, did we think this
through? What has been disrupted and how do we transform? Whose bodies are these?
We long for discussion; we are thirsty for new methods of bridge building, to new understandings of how
the disruptions that shake us so suddenly can now transform anew. Beyond closed doors and borders,
where does humanity stand? Have we been here before? And how have we misremembered? In our new
mid-pandemic world, surveillance, trepidation and injustice seems more apparent than ever. While
divided and politicised, who have we forgotten?
We can no longer ignore our current circumstances–we must discuss it all. In this pandemic world we
long for one another as we imagine this disco of activism and resistance, discussion and debate. History in
the Making is the longest-running student-driven history conference in Canada, now in its 27th year. The

organizing committee calls loudly and clearly to all disciplines of the humanities and beyond to join us in
spring 2022 in Tiohtia:ke / Montréal in a gathering of rich discussion and presentation. We collectively
seek to unravel topics relating to individualized interpretations of the following themes:
Bodies Disruption Transformation
Please send your papers to hitm.concordia@gmail.com by Sunday, January 30th, 2022 at 11:59 PM.


Call for Papers: Indiana University Paul Lucas Graduate Conference
Theme: Rethinking the Archive in Times of the Pandemic

The History Graduate Student Association at Indiana University is pleased to announce our annual
Paul Lucas Graduate Conference for Friday and Saturday, March 25th and 26th, 2022. This
interdisciplinary conference is inspired by the manifold questions raised by the ongoing pandemic!s
impact on archival research. Seeking to stimulate reappraisals of archival work at a time when the
Covid-19 pandemic has transformed the ways many scholars carry out academic research, our
conference centers the following questions: How has the global pandemic challenged scholars to
adjust their own research and methods? What new questions and archival approaches has this
moment necessitated? How should scholars understand the episteme of the historical archive? What
does it mean to create an archive in the digital age? How are researchers expanding the utility of the
archive both within and outside the history discipline?

Our Keynote Address will be given by Dr. Alaina Roberts, Assistant Professor of History at the
University of Pittsburgh, IU Alum, and award-winning author of I!ve Been Here All the While: Black
Freedom on Native Land. Follow Professor Roberts on Twitter.

We welcome submissions for individual papers from graduate students of all disciplines, including,
but not limited to: History, Anthropology, Political Science, Sociology, Geography, Art History &
Literature, Religious Studies, Area Studies, Cultural Studies, Gender Studies, and Queer Studies.
Proposals may include any temporal, thematic, and geographic approaches to archival inquiry. Our
conference will be held in person, on the beautiful campus of Indiana University—Bloomington.

We invite abstracts on the following themes; however, this list is by no means exhaustive and may
include other subjects:
• Voices and silences in the archive
• Reading along and against the archival grain
• Citizenship, belonging, and national identity
• Oral and multi-sensory source bases
• Material culture and the archive
• Political violence, ethnic cleansing, and genocide
• Digitalization, accessibility, and new trends in archival studies
Submission details: If you are interested in participating, please submit the following materials as
pdf attachments to the HGSA email, hgsaconf@iu.edu, by January 10, 2022.
• Paper title and brief abstract (max, 200 words)
• Curriculum Vitae (max, two pages)

The HGSA Conference Committee will evaluate abstracts and inform participants of their
acceptance and panel assignment by January 31, 2022. Final papers must be submitted by March 14,
2022. Please submit any questions to hgsaconf@iu.edu.

For updates, follow us on Twitter (@IUconference) or on our website hgsa.indiana.edu.


The Susman Conference Steering Committee at the Department of History, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, seeks your help in distributing the attached CFP for the 44th Annual Susman Graduate Conference. The Conference will take place on April 1, 2022, as a hybrid event on Rutgers-New Brunswick campus (fingers crossed!) and on Zoom simultaneously. Please see the attached CFP for details.

This year, our theme is “Crossing Boundaries: Disruption, Disturbance, and Defiance.” The Conference welcomes papers from graduate students in history as well as other disciplines on the theme of histories across boundaries. We particularly look forward to proposals that connect histories across the boundaries of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, technology, borders, and species.

Dr. Jen Manion (Ph.D. ’08 Rutgers), Professor of History, and Sexuality, Women’s and Gender Studies at Amherst College, will give the keynote lecture for the conference. Dr. Manion’s scholarship addresses social and cultural histories of gender and sexuality in the United States and the United Kingdom. Professor Manion’s most recent book is Female Husbands: A Trans History (Cambridge, 2020).

Abstracts of up to 300 words with a working title, as well as a one-page curriculum vitae, should be sent by January 31, 2022, to susmanconf@history.rutgers.edu. Selected participants will be notified of their acceptance by mid-February.


Philosophy in the Wild (PhilWild) invites abstract submissions for presentations at our second annual conference, the theme of which is environmental philosophy, very broadly construed.* We are especially interested in papers dealing with issues surrounding environment and race. This event is an outdoor, technology-free event.

 

From June 17th to 19th, 2022, presenters will camp at Ridley Creek State Park in Pennsylvania. Non-presenting participants will be invited to attend the presentations during daytime hours. Activities will include (though will not be limited to) a keynote presentation, participant presentations, and hiking (optional). No prior camping experience is necessary; Philosophy in the Wild can work with presenters to help arrange gear rentals.


Selected papers will be eligible for publication in a special issue of the Public Philosophy Journal in collaboration with PhilWild.

 

*Environmental philosophy includes, but is not exhausted by, the following themes:

  • Environment and race; environmental racism

  • Environmental political philosophy; environmental justice

  • Environmental ethics; environmental aesthetics

  • Environment and capitalism

  • Postdevelopment and postcolonial theories

  • Philosophy of nature and metaphysics

  • Conservation; biodiversity

  • Environment and social identities, including disability, indigeneity, race, queer ecologies, and ecofeminism

  • Social ecology and ecoanarchism

  • Climate change; sustainability; future generations

  • Urban ecology 

  • Environment and technology

  • Environment and religion

  • Animal ethics and critical animal studies

  • Environment and human flourishing


Abstracts should be approximately 500 words. Please submit your abstract in .pdf format, prepared for anonymous review, to philosophywild@gmail.com. In the body of the email, please include your name, university affiliation, and paper title. Papers should be suitable for a 25-minute presentation and a 25-minute Q&A session. Submissions from members of underrepresented groups in philosophy are especially encouraged.


This event is wheelchair accessible.  


The event will follow the relevant local directives regarding Covid-19.


Please contact philosophywild@gmail.com with any inquiries.


Submission deadline: February 1, 2022


Decisions announced: March 1, 2022


Dates of conference: June 17-19, 2022


Keynote Speaker: Romy Opperman (The New School for Social Research)


Organized by: Philosophy in the Wild 


Funded by: Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium


Contact: philosophywild@gmail.com 


Hemispheres: The Tufts Journal of International Affairs

Hemispheres, The Tufts Undergraduate Journal of International Affairs, is one of the oldest undergraduate journals in the field and is now accepting submissions relating to this year’s theme of Crisis of Authority. Submissions should be research articles, approx. 5000-8000 words, written by undergraduates in a broad range of fields relevant to international affairs. To view detailed paper requirements and guidelines, please visit this link. To submit a paper, or if you have any questions or concerns, please contact tuftshemispheres@gmail.com.

Submission Deadline: February 1st, 2022.

We welcome and encourage a broad interpretation of the theme. Potential research topics may include, but are not limited to:

Great power competition, populism, international liberal order, elections, contested elections, international organizations and institutions, protest movements, gender issues, clash of cultures, refugees, migrations, globalization, authoritarianism, democracy movements, pandemic response, fall of Afghanistan, misinformation, climate change, natural disasters, financial turbulence, corruption, human rights, freedom of speech, genocide, civil war, technological development, cybersecurity, and more.


18th Annual Graduate History Association Conference, April 8-9, 2022.
Subject to Change: Adaptation in Moments of Ongoing Crisis

The Graduate History Association of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst invites proposals
for its 18th annual interdisciplinary conference. This year’s conference is entitled “Subject to
Change: Adaptation in Moments of Ongoing Crisis” and will take place virtually over Zoom
and in person at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus from April 8-9, 2022. All
panels will be streamed online.

This conference seeks to bring graduate students together to consider the historical roots of
contemporary social change; a global pandemic and health crisis, political and social uprisings,
anti-Black, Brown, Asian, and Indigenous racism and violence, and police brutality. We invite
conference participants to think expansively about the historical spaces, actors (living and
nonliving), and narrative threads that encompass the relationship between adaptations to crises
and their implications. How might we reinterpret social movements and their origins or
afterlives? How have individuals and institutions responded to crises? What are the political and
affective meanings of “crisis?” And how have researchers and educators adapted to crises within
and beyond their disciplines?

We welcome research that deals with historical questions in a variety of fields in the humanities,
arts, and social sciences, such as American studies, global history, public history, economics,
anthropology, sociology, and public health.

Proposals will be accepted until February 1, 2022 and accepted applicants will be notified
February 18, 2022. Applicants should indicate whether they will present virtually or in-person.
Submit proposals here: https://forms.gle/F4MVDbFBKpCFueaF7


CALL FOR PAPERS

Critical Ethnic Studies Issue 8.2: Critiques of Militarization and Ethnic Studies

Anjali Nath, UC Davis
Crystal Mun-hye Baik, UC Riverside

For this special issue, we seek contributions that emerge from within ethnic studies but speak broadly to and exceed what might be recognized as the interdisciplinary formation of critical militarization studies. Prominent political scientists, political economists, security studies scholars, sociologists, and geographers are inclined to describe militarization as a technological infrastructure that targets or disproportionately impacts vulnerable groups. As ethnic studies and feminist scholars, we draw on a more nuanced internationalist analysis that recognizes militarization as an always already raced, gendered, and sexualized formation anchored in racial capitalism. Moreover, we recognize the victims of war and the subjects of militarization to be overwhelmingly poor people and the working class worldwide. Mobilized by the historical juncture we find ourselves in while also understanding that this moment is an extension of prolonged crisis, our special issue challenges an approach to militarization that is both presentist and technofetishist. Drawing from existing traditions in ethnic studies and gender studies, this special issue examines how the structuring logics of war, militarism, and militarization are central to, rather than separate from, the making – and unmaking – of everyday life.

Critical ethnic and gender studies can speak not only to the particular or provincial, but rather to the broad apparatuses and mundane conditions of militarization. Militarization we understand as a changing set of macro and micro processes, social relations, state and non-state infrastructures, epistemes, and ideologies that reproduce and protect forms of accumulation under racial capitalism. In situating militarization within the discourse of racial capitalism — and, necessarily by extension, imperialism — this special issue emphasizes the enduring significance of race, gender, sexuality, and class to questions of surveillance and security. Such positioning refuses the false binary between domestic policing and international entanglements of the military and intelligence agencies. Racialized, gendered, and sexualized bodies are not merely hypervulnerable destinations of militarized might. Rather, the development and emergent practices of militarization are inextricable from racial capitalist logics, even in their most mundane forms.

In foregrounding the changing conditions of militarization, we are committed to dynamic scholarship that shifts the focus from the seemingly insurmountable force and singular logic of imperial aggression to the lifeworlds, embodied positionalities, and fugitive perspectives of those most impacted by militarization (and does so without upholding singular or romanticized notions of unmediated “voice,” authenticity, and agency). We seek essays, articles, and other contributions that speak directly to the imperial nature of militarization and its long histories. In some ways, the questions may simply be distilled into a simple inquiry: what might critical militarization studies and ethnic studies learn from each other? Or what might critical militarization studies look like when it centers analytics within ethnic studies? It is our contention that ethnic studies is — and has been — a key site for studies of state violence and it is our intention to draw focus back to ethnic studies as a critical location for theorizing militarization. As part of this special issue, we are also interested in how interdisciplinary scholars, out of urgency and necessity, craft improvised methodologies that attend to militarized violence and address the situatedness of militarization while underscoring the linkages between the local and global. We are open to all regional specializations and welcome work that is transnational and global in scope. Areas of focus may include:

  • Racialization in the context of American imperial/colonial aggression

  • Histories of Black internationalism and the politics of solidarity

  • The labor and class politics of warfare, war making, and war mongering

  • Immigration, policing, detention, and border studies

  • Studies of Anti-imperialism, Marxism, and Third Worldism in relation to critical militarization studies

  • Histories of sexual labor and violence

  • Fugitive methodologies conditioned by militarization

  • Ethnographies of militarized infrastructures and the social life of military violence (exs: ethnographies of teargas or policing, US Aid, etc.)

  • Race, gender, sexuality in the life of infrastructures and logistics

  • Technological and logistic histories of racialized and sexual violence

  • Racialized visualities and militarized ways of seeing

  • Militarization and the mundane/ordinary

  • Environmental justice and the movements against militarized waste and toxicity

  • Specific case studies of military aggression, covert actions, coups, and the activist histories that challenge them.

Critical Ethnic Studies welcomes submissions in numerous forms, including peer-reviewed essays, interviews, political education documents, syllabi, and works-in-translation. You may find guidelines for these varying formats on the CES submissions page: http://www.criticalethnicstudiesjournal.org/submissions

For full consideration, please send 200-300 word abstracts and a condensed CV by February 1st, 2022 to Critical.Militarization.Studies@gmail.com, (please cc: justice@criticalethnicstudies.org). Full manuscripts will be due for peer review by April 1st, 2022, for those invited to submit.

https://www.criticalethnicstudiesjournal.org/submissions 


The History, Classics, and Religion Graduate Students’ Association of the University of Alberta is pleased to announce we are now accepting submissions for our annual interdisciplinary graduate conference! The conference will be held March 24th-27th, 2022 and will be a virtual event via Zoom. Please submit an abstract of 250 words maximum and a short biography (~ 50 words) as a Word or PDF file to conference.hcgsa@gmail.com by February 5th, 2022. CFP for Recovery Conference below.


The Gateway History Journal is looking for submissions for our 2022 issue and would like to invite all students to submit history essays for our 21st volume!

Gateway is run by undergraduate students at Washington University in St. Louis. We produce one annual issue showcasing the five best pieces of undergraduate scholarship that we receive.

In order to be considered for publication, all paper submissions should adhere to the following criteria: 

  • Papers must be between 10-35 pages in length (double-spaced), NOT including footnotes and works cited page(s).
  • Papers must follow the Chicago Manual of Style guidelines.

Papers are not restricted by topic, region, or time period.

Submissions are due by February 05, 2022 and should be submitted as a Word Document to gatewayhistoryjournal@gmail.com with “Gateway History Journal Submission” in the subject line. If you have any questions, feel free to send us an email at gatewayhistoryjournal@gmail.com


MESAAS Graduate Student Conference 2022: Borders and Boundaries [24–25 March 2022]

The Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS) at Columbia University is pleased to announce its annual Graduate Student Conference to be held on 24–25 March 2022. This conference is a space for graduate students to present their original work in a welcoming and stimulating environment.

Our theme this year interrogates borders and boundaries: exploring what these formations mean, how they come to be fixed and changed, what they engender and obfuscate. How do we, in the humanities and social sciences, interact with these categories, in order to question what—as well as who—lies within, outside, across, and along these fields of inquiry? Through the papers and discussions at this year’s conference, we hope to complicate the naturalization of borders and boundaries and the concepts and methodologies that engage with them. How are these physical and abstract configurations simultaneously maintained, ignored, challenged, and manipulated as they delineate, inform, and constrict?

We welcome a wide range of submissions that speak to our general theme and encourage (but do not seek to limit) interpretations of borders and boundaries within the following frames of thought:

  • Territorial (mapped boundaries, partition, disputed territories, state borders, mobility)
  • Regional (“area” studies, transregionality, oceanic thought, migration)
  • Political (the nation-state, constitutionality, federalism, institutions, center and periphery, governance and administration, international/diplomatic relations, citizenship)
  • Legal (jurisdiction, immigration and refugee law, criminality, carcerality, legal traditions)
  • Textual (intertextuality, genre, form, narrative, literariness, language traditions, orality, translation)
  • Media (transmedia, media ecology, media convergence, formal-informal media practices, circulation, media economy)
  • Gender and Sexuality (body, performance/performativity, trans and intersex identity, sexual boundaries, queerness)
  • Identity (race, religion, ethnicity, caste, diaspora, self)
  • Temporal (history, historiography, periodization, progress)
  • Spatial (rurality, urbanity, urbanism, architecture, design, built environment, political and human geography)
  • Epistemic (knowledge frameworks, institutions of power, Nature/Society, colonialism, decoloniality)
  • Ontological (materialism, ways of living, embodiment, personhood)

Our conference will predominantly be held on Zoom. We invite graduate students from across the world to submit a 350–400 word abstract for a twenty-minute presentation along with a 100-word bio via this form: https://forms.gle/V4BTHcVpCcpCPqENA by Monday, 7 February 2022. Notification of paper acceptance will be sent by the end of February. You can keep updated on the conference via Twitter: https://twitter.com/MESAAS_GSA. For any questions or inquiries, please contact mesaasgraduateconference@gmail.com.


CALL FOR PAPERS: MESAAS Graduate Student Conference 2022:
The Middle East, South Asian, and African Studies department at Columbia University is pleased to announce its annual Gradual Student Conference. Our theme this year interrogates borders and boundaries, and through our conference, we hope to complicate the naturalization of these formations as well as the concepts and methodologies that engage them.
Submissions by Monday, 7 February 2022
Pan-African Youth Conference 2022:
Between March 26th – 27th, the African Student Association of Notre Dame, in conjunction with the Pan-African Students Union at Northwestern University, will host the second edition of the Pan-African Youth Conference, which will bring together young people from across the world with the aim of fostering a critical and shared understanding of Africa’s historical and contemporary challenges. This year’s Conference will be held under the theme: Which Way, Africa? As we explore the alternative paths for Africa’s political, economic, and cultural development. 
Participants at the Conference will engage in discussions guided by four critical questions; 1) WHO are we as Africans? 2) WHERE are we as a continent? 3) HOW did we get where we are? and 4) WHERE do we go from here? Discussions will take place within three committees; a) Politics & Governance b) Socioeconomic transformation c) Culture & Identity. The Conference will feature a keynote address by Dr. Lwazi Lushaba from the University of Cape Town. For more information, please visit the Conference website
For more information, visit: https://www.panafricanyouthconference.org

 


DCDC22

Inclusive Innovation: digital creativity and opportunities

Call for papers

 

Dear colleagues,

DCDC22 invites proposals on this year’s theme of Inclusive Innovation: digital creativity and opportunities on any project involving archives, libraries, museums and other heritage and cultural organisations and groups in partnership with each other, communities and the academic sector.

 

DCDC (Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities) is a cross-sectoral conference, hosted by The National ArchivesRLUK and Jisc, that brings together the GLAMA sector (galleries, libraries, archives, museums and academia) to share our experiences, innovations, interests and concerns. DCDC22 (which will be held virtually from 11-15 July 2022) will showcase how digital innovation is transforming the cultural heritage and academic sectors and their relationship with their audiences.

Emerging technologies have brought considerable benefits to cultural heritage organisations, transforming approaches to institutional collections, our ways of working, and the way people discover and engage with collections. As research continues to drive innovation, how can we ensure that our practices remain relevant, open, inclusive, representative and transformative? How can our practices in turn enable new innovations?

The deadline for submissions is close of business on Friday, 11 February 2022.

Learn more and complete your submission here.


CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – Past Imperfect Volume XXIV (2022)

Past Imperfect is a peer-reviewed graduate student journal based out of the Department of History, Classics, &
Religion at the University of Alberta. We are currently welcoming submissions in English from graduate
students in all areas of history and classics for publication in its twenty-fourth annual edition. This open
access journal provides an opportunity for developing scholars to gain experience with peer-reviewed
academic publishing.

Past Imperfect welcomes original research articles and book reviews covering a broad range of both time and
geography. The journal especially encourages the submission of revised term papers, conference
presentations, or thesis chapters. Articles that appear in Past Imperfect are abstracted in “America: History
and Life” and “Historical Abstracts.”

Please include one copy of your work, which must have all identifiers removed, along with an abstract of no
more than 300 words, and a cover page containing your contact information.
Authors should submit their documents by February 15th, 2022 for consideration in the 2022 issue. For
more information or to submit please contact pastimpe@ualberta.ca.

Submission Guidelines for Articles and Reviews
1. Research Articles
Submissions will undergo a blind review process by two to three reviewers (including at least one
faculty member).
Reviewers make their recommendations for publication based on the following criteria:
Style & Structure: Originality & Argumentation:
– Approximately 20-30 double-spaced pages – Based on primary sources
– Clarity and coherence – Sound methodology
– Structured and organized presentation – Conversant with relevant literature
– Adherence to the Chicago Manual of Style
-no more than 5 images

– Sophisticated analysis

2. Reviews
– Approximately 4-6 double-spaced pages
– Reviews of works published in the previous five years
– Adherence to the Chicago Manual of Style

Past Imperfect Journal
Department of History, Classics, & Religion
University of Alberta
2-28 Tory Building
Edmonton, AB T6G 2H4 Canada
Past Imperfect Journal


Call for Papers

Enchanting Literatures

The 26th Annual Comparative Literature Intra-Student Faculty Forum (CLIFF)

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

May 20-21, 2022

Keynote Speaker: Professor Michael Allan

Submission Deadline: February 20, 2022

How are our affective encounters with literature, art, and media bound by time, and how are we also—in such encounters—temporally unbound? If literary texts have variously been framed as anticipating, disruptive of, conforming to, producing, inhabiting, and/or responding to axes of time (as “timely,” “untimely,” “ahead of their time,” “nostalgic,” or “avant-garde”), they have likewise been understood as objects of pure fascination, aesthetic experience, and enchantment. 

Enchantment, in particular, is frequently understood as an ephemeral experience, unique to the moment of our encounter with the enchanting. We are enchanted by things for brief, passing moments; we sometimes return to a once-enchanting object only to find the glamor it once cast upon us has broken; and at other times, this rediscovery itself—re-encountering a text or encountering it in a new (translated, adapted) form—prompts our re-enchantment. 

To mark its 26th anniversary, the University of Michigan Comparative Literature Intra-Student Faculty Forum (CLIFF) calls for submissions to a virtual graduate conference that critically and creatively explores the intersection of world literatures, temporalities, and enchantment. We welcome work that investigates literary and artistic constructions of and responses to notions of temporality and enchantment from aesthetic, historical, industrial, material, technological, speculative, post/colonial, feminist, queer, religious, translational, local and/or global perspectives. CLIFF 2022 invites submissions from graduate students (U-M and beyond) and is open to academic papers from across disciplines that deal with a wide variety of languages and time periods as well as creative and experimental genres. Proposals of no more than 250 words may be submitted to cliff.complit@umich.edu by February 20. Please include a short bio (100–150 words) with the abstract.

Some potential topics to explore might include but are not limited to: 

  • Enchantment in/with literature and art

  • Politics of/as enchantment

  • “World literature” as enchantment  

  • Modernities, technologies, and enchantment

  • History, temporalities, and literature

  • Modes of reading and writing

  • Literary production, circulation, and labor

  • Media and the representation of enchantment

  • Rupture, fragmentation, and enchantment

  • Attention, difficulty, and other barriers to aesthetic experience

  • Reception, translation, adaptation, and the aesthetics of temporal lag

  • Sacred and secular enchantments

  • Unlikely, wayward, or queer enchantments

  • Nostalgias, futurities, and utopias 

Michael Allan’s research focuses on debates in world literature, postcolonial studies, literary theory, as well as film and visual culture, primarily in Africa and the Middle East. In both his research and teaching, he bridges textual analysis with social theory, and draws from methods in anthropology, religion, queer theory and area studies. He is the author of In the Shadow of World Literature: Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt (Princeton 2016, Co-Winner of the MLA Prize for a First Book) and of articles in venues such as PMLA, Modernism/Modernity, Comparative Literature Studies, Early Popular Visual Culture, The International Journal of Middle East Studies, and the Journal of Arabic Literature. He is also a guest editor of a special issue of Comparative Literature (“Reading Secularism: Religion, Literature, Aesthetics”), and with Elisabetta Benigni, an issue of Philological Encounters (“Lingua Franca: Toward a Philology of the Sea”). He is at work on a second book, Picturing the World: The Global Routes of Early Cinema, 1896-1903, which traces the transnational history of camera operators working for the Lumière Brothers film company.

Lena Grimm, Sam McCracken, Olan Munson, Jaideep Pandey, Katherine Tapia, and Berkay Uluç

CLIFF 2022 Organizing Committee 


The journal Philological Encounters invites article submissions for its workshop:

Philology and archaeology. On manuscript collections unearthed by archaeology

Accepted proposals will be presented and discussed in a workshop to be held at the Centre Jacques-Berque (Rabat, Morocco) on 24-25 May 2022 and, upon positive review, published in Philological Encounters.

Deadline for submission of proposals: 25 February 2022

Philology and archaeology

On manuscript collections unearthed by archaeology

Since the nineteenth-century, there have been numerous examples of eminent findings of manuscript collections in archaeological contexts. Some of these have necessarily captured the attention of philologists, starting with the hundreds of thousands of manuscripts from the genizah of Cairo, unearthed in 1896, which have since produced a refined social history of the medieval city. A few years later, the caves of Dunhuang yielded thousands of manuscripts from multiple traditions, especially Buddhist, allowing a recasting of historical studies on its diffusion along the silk road during the first millennium. Similarly, the manuscripts of Qumran, found from 1947 in clay jars on the edge of the Dead Sea, revolutionised biblical studies, offering direct access to texts hitherto uniquely available at the end of a long chain of transmission. Likewise, the Qur’anic manuscripts discovered at the Great Mosque in Sanʿāʾ and the multi-lingual manuscripts found at the Qubbat al-Khazna at the Umayyad Great Mosque in Damascus have invigorated philological and historical research. Alongside these outstanding discoveries, how many more manuscripts were found through archaeological explorations and away from institutions crafted to preserve them, such as libraries or archives?

These fortuitous manuscript discoveries do not exhaust all the intersections between philology and archaeology, but they stress the need to rethink their relation. Building on case studies of textual corpora uncovered by archaeology, this workshop aims to re-interrogate the common history, and explore a few missed epistemological encounters between the two disciplines.

Whether in biblical studies or classical studies, for instance, archaeology and philology share common topics and periods of the past that specialists can grasp, either through texts that have been transmitted by the traditions of preservation and copying, or through the material assemblages that have been uncovered by archaeologists. Archaeology and philology also share a common discipline – epigraphy – which mobilises material and textual registers in various ways.

Nevertheless, the history of epigraphy illustrates the chronological gap between the institutionalisation of philology and that of archaeology. In the Western tradition, nearly three centuries separate their recognition as fields of knowledge of the past. In Europe, academies of inscriptions go back to the 16th century, in the wake of the scientific triumph of philology, while archaeology had to wait until the 19th and even the 20th century to be endowed with scientific institutions. Even though complementary, their respective histories consist of gaps, of competition, of dominant and auxiliary positions, of the wish for autonomy and independence.

Although philology and archaeology regularly intersect over topics, periods, and even disciplines such as epigraphy, they continue to be suspicious of one another, ready to declare themselves epistemologically irreconcilable. For instance, the notion of context, rather than representing a common heuristic vocabulary, often divides the two knowledge systems. While philology’s ideal has long appeared as the establishment of an original text capable of definitively freeing itself from all that it does not contain, and from the different contexts that it has passed through or that have passed through it, the practice of archaeology gives context a unique place in knowledge production when the objects unearthed have meaning only through their exact situation and localization, and through their link to the external context.

One also finds many similarities from the point of view of techniques of knowledge. Stemmatology on the one hand, stratigraphy on the other; both seek an original item and meaning, recalling the similarities of the two approaches. Their complementarity is rarely examined besides a clear ‘chiasmatic’ relation. Philology aims towards materialising meaning; archaeology towards semanticising materiality. In recent years, the developments in textual studies, such as material bibliography, have clearly confirmed the possibility of a convergence. Manuscripts found in an archaeological context highlight particularly well the need for a material science of textual supports.

Possible topics for contributions include, but are not limited to:

  • Case studies of manuscripts unearthed by archaeology
  • History of philological and archaeological scholarship
  • Archaeology at the service of philology & philology at the service of archaeology
  • Comparative epistemological studies of philology and archaeology
  • Historical accounts of the uses of context in archaeological and philological research
  • History of manuscript transmission over time (traditions and institutions)
  • The politics of contextualisation and territorialisation in colonial and nationalist knowledge production (“facts on the ground”)

Application

Proposals, consisting of a title, a 600-800-word description and a brief CV, should be sent as a single, merged PDF to secretariat(at)cjb.ma by 25 February 2022. Notifications of acceptance or non-acceptance will be sent out by 15 March 2022. Accepted proposals will be invited to take part in an in-person workshop at the Centre Jacques-Berque (Rabat, Morocco) on 24-25 May 2022. In case it is not possible to have a meeting in Rabat, the workshop will take place as a hybrid event. Limited funding is available. Please indicate in your application whether you can cover your travel and/or accommodation expenses. We especially welcome contributions from scholars from the Global South as well as junior researchers.

After the workshop, participants are expected to complete their papers within 6 months (max. 9000 words). All contributions will undergo double-blind peer review. Upon positive peer review, the paper will be published in Philological Encounters.

Any queries should be addressed to Dr. Adrien Delmas: secretariat(at)cjb.ma

This event is convened by Adrien Delmas (Centre Jacques-Berque, Rabat) and Islam Dayeh (FU Berlin), and is sponsored by Centre Jacque-Berques (Rabat), Freie Universität Berlin, Zukunftsphilologie/Forum Transregionale Studien Berlin and Brill.


CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – Past Imperfect Volume XXIV (2022)

Past Imperfect is a peer-reviewed graduate student journal based out of the Department of History, Classics, &
Religion at the University of Alberta. We are currently welcoming submissions in English from graduate
students in all areas of history, classics, and religion for publication in its twenty-fourth annual edition. This
open access journal provides an opportunity for developing scholars to gain experience with peer-reviewed
academic publishing.

Past Imperfect welcomes original research articles and book reviews covering a broad range of both time and
geography. The journal especially encourages the submission of revised term papers, conference
presentations, or thesis chapters. Articles that appear in Past Imperfect are abstracted in “America: History
and Life” and “Historical Abstracts.”

Please include one copy of your work, which must have all identifiers removed, along with an abstract of no
more than 300 words, and a cover page containing your contact information.

Authors should submit their documents by March 5, 2022 for consideration in the 2022 issue. For more
information or to submit please contact pastimpe@ualberta.ca.
Submission Guidelines for Articles and Reviews

1. Research Articles
Submissions will undergo a blind review process by two to three reviewers (including at least one
faculty member).
Reviewers make their recommendations for publication based on the following criteria:
Style & Structure: Originality & Argumentation:
– Approximately 20-30 double-spaced pages – Based on primary sources
– Clarity and coherence – Sound methodology
– Structured and organized presentation – Conversant with relevant literature
– Adherence to the Chicago Manual of Style
-no more than 5 images

– Sophisticated analysis

2. Reviews
– Approximately 4-6 double-spaced pages
– Reviews of works published in the previous five years
– Adherence to the Chicago Manual of Style

Past Imperfect Journal
Department of History, Classics, & Religion
University of Alberta
2-28 Tory Building
Edmonton, AB T6G 2H4 Canada
Past Imperfect Journal


Conference of the Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies,

University of London

Call for Papers: Refugees from Nazism: Innovation in Engineering and

Industry

Historically, Exile Studies have concentrated on social, political and cultural
themes but in recent years – most notably with the Conference of the
Gesellschaft für Exilforschung in Vienna in 2014 and the subsequent
publication of its Proceedings Kometen des Geldes – economic questions have
moved from the periphery to the centre of academic enquiry. With this in
mind, the Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies at the
Institute for Modern Languages Research, University of London is inviting
contributors to speak at its Conference on 13 and 14 September, 2023 on
Refugees to Britain from Nazism: Innovation in Engineering and Industry. The
conference will be both online and live at Senate House, University of London.

Key Areas of enquiry could include:
Aryanisation and transfer of existing companies in the Third Reich
Establishment of engineering and manufacturing and other companies by
refugees from Nazism
Impact of economic conditions on émigré entrepreneurs
Wartime changes in legislation and their implications for emigrants engaged in
trade and industry
Innovation in engineering and industry: development of new products,
processes and technology in Britain and/or overseas
Development of international trade links
Career change and retraining
The impact of internment on refugee engineers and industrialists
Refugee employees of British engineering and manufacturing companies in
Britain
Restitution for Aryanised companies

Legacy of refugee engineering and industry

Contributions may be in either English or German for 30-minute papers.
The deadline for offers of papers is 30 June 2022. An abstract not exceeding
300 words together with a short speaker biography, both as attached WORD
documents, should be sent to the editors by that date: a.nyburg@ic.ac.uk
and c.brinson@ic.ac.uk
Selected papers from the conference will be published in the Research
Centre’s Yearbook 21 (2024)

Editors:
Dr Anna Nyburg
Prof. Charmian Brinson

Job Listings (teaching; assisting with research; tutoring; etc.) & Internships
@CSERColumbia & @IRAASColumbiaU are jointly searching for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Black Geographies. Apply here: https://apply.interfolio.com/94825

Public History Consultant

The Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services, a prominent provider of mental health and
social services to New York City residents, seeks a graduate student in history with an interest in
philanthropy to serve as a consultant for a multi-year project leading up to The Jewish Board’s
150th anniversary celebration in 2024.

The history of The Jewish Board begins in late-nineteenth century New York City, and tracks the
origination of private welfare institutions, the beginning of family law, and the profession of
social work itself. In 1874, the city was the center of a flourishing immigrant community.

Alongside this arose a range of social problems: poverty, crime, the exploitation of labor, and
the unchecked spread of tuberculosis. Two early precursors to The Jewish Board were formed
in response to these social issues: United Hebrew Charities and The Jewish Prisoner’s Aid
Society.

Over the next century, these two organizations changed their names and broadened their
missions: in the 1920s they incorporated the discipline of social work, created programs to
address homelessness, and provided basic social services; in the 1930s, these programs
expanded to help support New York’s immigrants through The Great Depression. Over the
subsequent decades of the twentieth century, these agencies were acquired and merged into
other entities, altering their foci and missions to keep pace with societal and demographic
changes. The present-day Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services came into existence in
1978.

Using primary source materials including clinical case notes, Board meeting minutes, and other
archival materials that have been minimally catalogued, the Public History Consultant will
unearth unique stories, insights, and trends that will be translated into many different types of
content to tell the history of The Jewish Board. The Public History Consultant will conceive,
develop and implement curatorial, interpretive, and original research projects; other
deliverables will include creating content for social media and for a microsite that will educate
and inform the public about The Jewish Board’s history. Ultimately the material collected by the

Public History Consultant may be used to create a book and/or a symposium in conjunction
with the agency’s 150th anniversary in 2024, thus informing the present-day social service
sector’s approach to policy and advocacy.

This project will address the roots of many of the intractable issues and fragmented social
service systems that are part of the fabric of contemporary New York life from the nineteenth
through the twenty-first centuries.

Qualified candidates must:
• Be currently enrolled in a graduate program in History;
• Have a demonstrated interest in social history;

• Have experience with archival and material culture collections;
• Possess experience working with multiple collaborators and stakeholders;
• Demonstrate superb writing and communication skills and a proficiency in social media;
• Live within the New York/ New Jersey/ Connecticut/ Philadelphia area; and
• Be prepared to commit to a two-to-three year project
Compensation will be commensurate with experience.
To apply, please send a brief letter of interest and your CV to marketing@jbfcs.org


Postdoctoral Research Scholar/Scientist – INTERFOLIO LINK HERE

Columbia University in the City of New York: Arts and Sciences Core – Interdisciplinary: Center for Science and Society

Location

01

Open Date

Jan 07, 2022

Description

Columbia University recognizes the importance of the co-production of knowledge in climate-related research. We invite applications for a postdoctoral researcher who will focus on advancing our commitment to ethical and informed practices around the co-production of knowledge. We seek early career researchers with expertise in transdisciplinary research across some combination of the following themes: Indigenous knowledge, climate science and/or social science, impact of climate change on communities, co-production of knowledge, science communication.

Candidates from Indigenous and First Nation communities are especially welcome to apply as are candidates with personal or research experience with Indigenous and First Nations communities and organizations.

Housed in the Center for Science and Society, this two-year, grant-funded position is an opportunity to work with scholars and faculty mentors from diverse fields ranging from anthropology, history, ethnomusicology, ecology, journalism, American studies, Native and Indigenous studies, ethnic studies, political science, economics, engineering, earth science and oceanography to document good practices in the ethical co-production of knowledge. The postdoctoral researcher  will create a series of annotated bibliographies focused on the co-production of knowledge across several domains, work with researchers across all the Columbia University units to convene a working group on co-production, develop sample syllabi for undergraduate, masters and doctoral courses on co-production, and produce a document that codifies good practices based on this work as well as input from leaders in the successful practice of co-production that can be disseminated widely.  The successful candidate will help organize a workshop to this end and will also contribute to a webinar series that introduces the landscape of co-production of knowledge. The candidate will also have opportunities to work on media outreach and developing narratives that can be used for pedagogy and real-world research design.

Eligibility requirements include a Ph.D. in either one of the disciplines listed above or related social, environmental, or climate sciences. The doctorate must be awarded prior to the start of appointment, and candidates must have received their degree within the past five years prior to the start of this appointment. The successful applicant will be appointed in the Center for Science and Society at Columbia University for a total of two years. Appointments will be made at the level of Postdoctoral Research Scholar or Scientist. Renewal for the second year will be based on satisfactory performance.

The search will remain open until the position is filled; however, application review will begin January 31, 2022. The appointment may start as early as spring 2022, but no later than July 1, 2022.

Columbia University benefits accompany this Postdoctoral Research Fellow appointment, please see https://research.columbia.edu/office-postdoctoral-affairs for more information. 

Columbia University values diversity and inclusion, and encourages applications from members of underrepresented minority groups.

Qualifications

Ph.D. in either one of the disciplines listed above or related social, environmental, or climate sciences. The doctorate must be awarded prior to the start of appointment, and candidates must have received their degree within the past five years prior to the start of this appointment.

Application Instructions

Candidates should provide the following: 1) CV, including a list of publications; 2) statement of research interests (no longer than 1000 words); 3) personal statement that includes the candidate’s science communication and outreach interests as well as brief statement of connection and commitments to community (no longer than 1000 words, combined); 4) names and email addresses of at least three references; and 5) writing sample: This can be a dissertation, other research publications, or work-in-progress with a suggestion of which chapter(s) would be most appropriate for a committee with members outside the candidate’s direct field to read.


Job: TT Assistant Professor – History of Medicine (McGill University)

Assistant Professor (Tenure Track), Department of Social Studies of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (L001065)

The Department of Social Studies of Medicine is seeking to hire at the rank of Assistant Professor (tenure-track). We are looking for a historian specializing in the history of medicine in any period from classical antiquity through the 18th century. The geographic focus of the candidate’s specialization is open. We welcome candidates whose work addresses cultural difference and/or global perspectives.    
 
The Department of Social Studies of Medicine is a multidisciplinary department (anthropology, history, sociology, biomedical ethics) that sees itself as a bridge between the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Arts.

McGill University was founded in 1819 and is consistently ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world and among the top three in Canada. McGill is located in Montreal (http://www.montrealinternational.com/en/), a diverse multiethnic city with a sparkling cultural life. Montreal has been selected numerous times as the best city for students in North America. Montreal is safe, housing costs are among the lowest for cities of comparable size, and overall quality of life is outstanding.  

McGill University is committed to equity in employment and diversity. It welcomes applications from Indigenous peoples, visible minorities, ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, women, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others who may contribute to further diversification.

APPLY HERE
 

Job Duties

Candidates will be expected to teach courses within the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Arts, and to carry out a program of research. The successful candidate will have potential or proven ability to develop an internationally recognized research program in ancient, medieval or early modern medicine, to obtain grants for their own research, and to contribute to the building of successful research projects and programs.

The candidate is expected to be actively involved in all aspects of McGill’s academic mission (research, teaching, supervision of a diverse body of graduate students and involvement in academic and administrative committees) and the mission of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. McGill faculty members are expected to contribute to service activities within their units, the University, and the wider scholarly community. A demonstrated commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion is also expected.
 

Qualifications and Education Requirements

Candidates must have:

  • a doctorate in History or allied field, and expertise in the history of ancient, medieval or early modern medicine and healthcare;
  • a record of publication in the field.

Faculty/Department/Unit: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Social Studies of Medicine
Employee Type: Tenure-Track (‘Academic Tenure Stream’)
Rank: Assistant Professor
Salary: Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience
Job Status: Full-time

The following supporting documents are required: 

  • Cover letter and curriculum vitae
  • Statement of research
  • Names and contact information of three referees

Use a personal email address when creating an account in Workday to submit your application. Do not use @mail.mcgill.ca or @mcgill.ca email accounts to apply.


Full- and part-time spring 2022 internships at the Institute for the Study of War.

Here is the flyer with all of the information, including links to the four applications for internships in intel analysis, innovation & tech, business development & marketing, editorial & non-profit management.

We are open to both remote and hybrid internships here in Washington, DC from January to May of 2022.

For the intel analysis internship, students with the following language skills are particularly encouraged to apply: Russian, Mandarin, Arabic, Farsi, Turkish, Kurdish, Dari, and Pashto.

For the innovation and tech internship, GIS and coding skills are directly applicable to the role.

I’m the director of the new Petraeus Center for Emerging Leaders here at the Institute. Don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions, whether about the internship in particular or the Institute more generally.

Brian Babcock-Lumish, Ph.D.

Recanati-Kaplan Chair &

Director, General David H. Petraeus Center for Emerging Leaders

Institute for the Study of War

Phone: (202) 489-4510

Email: bbabcocklumish@understandingwar.org


The Humanities and Sciences Department of the School of Visual Arts is looking for instructors to teach a one-semester introductory course on the following areas of history for the academic year 2022-2023. We are particularly interested in teaching approaches that work well with visual artists while addressing current issues.

·      Atlantic History
·      Middle East History
·      South Asian History
·      East Asian History

Qualifications: MA or Ph.D. candidate. 1 to 2 years college-level teaching experience is preferred. Familiarity with Learning Management Systems such as Canvas.

Please send cover letter and CV to: Laurie Johenning at ljohenning@sva.edu

Diversity and inclusion is a core principle of the College. SVA enjoys a community that represents a significant number of historically underrepresented communities, ethnic and religious backgrounds, gender identities, diverse abilities, and foreign countries, and all are encouraged to apply.

 

The Department of History at Michigan State University is seeking to recruit a junior scholar of early modern South Asia through a new university initiative. The Dean’s Research Associate Postdoctoral Fellowship in MSU’s College of Social Science serves to promote “an inclusive scholarly environment in which outstanding scholars in the social sciences support the advancement of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the academy.” Dean’s Research Associates will have a minimal teaching load, and will receive mentorship and support aimed at possibly transitioning them into tenure-system positions.  More information about the fellowship is available here:

https://socialscience.msu.edu/diversity/DRAP/index.html

We would appreciate it if you would consider circulating this opportunity among your students and colleagues. 

Best regards,

Asian History Faculty
Department of History
Michigan State University

Historifans is looking for contributors who want to geek out and write articles about the connections between contemporary pop culture and their scholarly interests. Historifans is a popular culture history site that seeks to create conversations that link current historical research with contemporary fandoms. We are currently in the process of building a pipeline of articles in preparation for our launch in early 2022. We highly encourage graduate students, early career academics, alt-ac professionals, non-traditional scholars, and people from historically marginalized and excluded groups to submit articles.  

Examples of current articles in progress: 

·         Pedagogy: Building the Star Wars galaxy through hypothetical archives 

·         Locating Star Wars droids in Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth 

    • Why Shango is a better god of thunder than Thor and would be a great addition to the Avengers after Thor retires 

·         Orientalism in the Potter-verse: A Case Study of Prof. Quirrell 

Articles should be no more than 1000 words long and must be accessible/readable for non-academic audiences. We are interested in articles that connect pedagogy, theory, sociology, history, anthropology, and/or other areas of inquiry to major fandoms including (but not limited to) Star Wars, Marvel, DC, Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, Star Trek, Lego, and Doctor Who. We also welcome digital humanities articles/projects.  Every article that we receive will go through a full review process.  

Are you interested in pitching an idea? Please fill out this form: https://forms.gle/Y9qjGCxHZkBnofqZ7 

Please email dsanchez@coloradocollege.edu if you have any questions.


Columbia University is pleased to offer an opportunity for your students with the Internship for Building Community Summer 2022 Program. We are hiring over 100 Program & Residential Life Assistants who will coordinate community building events and workshops, supervise students in the residence halls and on field trips, and support daily logistics for Columbia University’s High School Summer Immersion Program.

This paid opportunity is a chance for your students to further develop career readiness skills, take advantage of professional development opportunities within the IBC and Columbia University community, as well as spend their summer living in New York City! 

The IBC Application can be found here:

https://columbiauniversitysummerprogramforhighschoolstudents.formstack.com/forms/ibc_application_2022 

The deadline to apply is Sunday, February 6, 2022 @ 11:59 PM ET

This internship includes room and board at Columbia University in the City of New York, and is $18/hr working approximately 35 hours per week.  

We will be offering a variety of virtual information sessions for interested students to learn more about the IBC program and its open positions, the application process, and answer any questions they may have. 

Information Session Dates:

December 11, 2021 @ 12-1:30 PM ET

December 16, 2021 @ 7-8:30 PM ET

January 11, 2022 @ 7-8:30 PM ET

January 20, 2022 @ 7-8:30 PM ET

January 26, 2022 @ 7-8:30 PM ET

If interested in attending one of our Information Sessions, please fill out the RSVP form here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScXRj9JHoZYHIMVRbkckMA27UnAHlk7Fo8QM9Wmn5nTCV1a2g/viewform?usp=sf_link

Further questions about the program can be directed to ibc-apply@columbia.edu


We would like to share the news of two new funded PhD positions at Nottingham Trent University focused on industrial skills in heritage museums, linked below. Applications are due February 18th. Please feel free to share widely with any interested applicants, and questions can be directed to Dr. Tom Fisher at tom.fisher@ntu.ac.uk 

https://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/find-a-phd-opportunity/projects/art-design/analysing-industrial-skills-in-heritage-museums


Tinker Visiting Professorship
 

The Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) is pleased to announce its annual Tinker Visiting Professorship for academic year 2023-2024. (Fall 2023 – Spring 2024).  Columbia is one of five major universities to have a professorship endowed by the Tinker Foundation. The goal of the Tinker Visiting Professor program is to bring to the campus pre-eminent scholars and professionals—journalists, writers, artists, public officials—who are citizens of Latin America or the Iberian Peninsula and reside in the region, as a means of encouraging contact and collaboration.
 
A Tinker Visiting Professor offers to teach or co-teach one course, a mixed graduate/undergraduate class in their field of expertise. The visitor is also asked to give two public lectures. The visiting professor receives a stipend, office space at ILAS, assistance arranging Columbia housing, roundtrip airfare from their home country, and part-time research assistance. Funding can also be made available to support conferences or other events at Columbia related to the visitor’s fields of interest during or following their semester of residence. Application deadline: March 14th, 2022.Learn More Here
Conference and Seminar Applications

History Graduate Student Association
Annual Graduate Conference
March 18, 2022

“Conflict, Protest, Insurrection, Coup”

Events in recent years have brought into question the meaning of terms such as “protest,”
“riot,” and even “insurrection.” Peaceful demonstrations have been mischaracterized as
destructive riots, while some have downplayed violent insurrections as being nothing more than
tranquil protests. Fundamentally, such characterizations reflect not only cultural and political
bias, but also the different ways we perceive movements that advocate for change and object to
injustice. These issues and more pose several considerations: What criteria and biases do we
apply to our definitions of protests, riots, insurrections, and coups? What role does language play
in our understandings of conflict and protest, and how does it speak to wider questions of power
and hegemony? What processes have citizens used to promote institutional reform, and what
avenues have activists used when unable to proceed through conventional means? We invite
presentations that touch on these themes and topics across all geographic, methodological, and
temporal subfields of history, as well as interdisciplinary projects that address historical issues.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following:
• Methods of civil disobedience and protest.
• Perceptions and portrayals of public demonstrations.
• Insurrections, coups, and rebellions.
• The intersection of gender and race in the characterization of protests.
• Protests and riots in the ancient, pre-modern, and modern world.
Conference Details
The Annual History Graduate Student Association conference provides the opportunity for
graduate students to present and discuss their research with colleagues and peers, and to develop
their thoughts and ideas on important topics. Presentations will be grouped into panels in order to
facilitate greater discussion and interaction between scholars. Panels will consist of graduate
presenters, a graduate student commentator, and a faculty chair. The conference will feature a
series of morning and afternoon panels, as well as an address by a keynote speaker. No
registration fee is required.

Submission Requirements:
Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to umdgradhistconference@gmail.com by Friday, January 14th, 2022. If selected, participants will be asked to submit a ten-to-fifteen-page final version of their paper closer to the date of the conference. Please include a résumé or CV with your abstract submission. Please email Dustin Cranford at dcranfor@terpmail.umd.edu
or Evan Ash at erash@terpmail.umd.edu with questions. Proposal decision notifications will be
emailed by Friday January 28th, 2022.

 


Philosophy in the Wild (PhilWild) invites abstract submissions for presentations at our second annual conference, the theme of which is environmental philosophy, very broadly construed.* We are especially interested in papers dealing with issues surrounding environment and race. This event is an outdoor, technology-free event.

From June 17th to 19th, 2022, presenters will camp at Ridley Creek State Park in Pennsylvania. Non-presenting participants will be invited to attend the presentations during daytime hours. Activities will include (though will not be limited to) a keynote presentation, participant presentations, and hiking (optional). No prior camping experience is necessary; Philosophy in the Wild can work with presenters to help arrange gear rentals.


Selected papers will be eligible for publication in a special issue of the Public Philosophy Journal in collaboration with PhilWild.

*Environmental philosophy includes, but is not exhausted by, the following themes:

  • Environment and race; environmental racism

  • Environmental political philosophy; environmental justice

  • Environmental ethics; environmental aesthetics

  • Environment and capitalism

  • Postdevelopment and postcolonial theories

  • Philosophy of nature and metaphysics

  • Conservation; biodiversity

  • Environment and social identities, including disability, indigeneity, race, queer ecologies, and ecofeminism

  • Social ecology and ecoanarchism

  • Climate change; sustainability; future generations

  • Urban ecology 

  • Environment and technology

  • Environment and religion

  • Animal ethics and critical animal studies

  • Environment and human flourishing


Abstracts should be approximately 500 words. Please submit your abstract in .pdf format, prepared for anonymous review, to philosophywild@gmail.com. In the body of the email, please include your name, university affiliation, and paper title. Papers should be suitable for a 25-minute presentation and a 25-minute Q&A session. Submissions from members of underrepresented groups in philosophy are especially encouraged.

This event is wheelchair accessible.  

The event will follow the relevant local directives regarding Covid-19.

Please contact philosophywild@gmail.com with any inquiries.

Submission deadline: February 1, 2022

Decisions announced: March 1, 2022

Dates of conference: June 17-19, 2022

Keynote Speaker: Romy Opperman (The New School for Social Research)

Organized by: Philosophy in the Wild 

Funded by: Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium

Contact: philosophywild@gmail.com 


History Graduate Student Association
Annual Graduate Conference
March 18, 2022

“Conflict, Protest, Insurrection, Coup”

Extended Deadline: February 4th, 2022

Events in recent years have brought into question the meaning of terms such as “protest,”
“riot,” and even “insurrection.” Peaceful demonstrations have been mischaracterized as
destructive riots, while some have downplayed violent insurrections as being nothing more than
tranquil protests. Fundamentally, such characterizations reflect not only cultural and political
bias, but also the different ways we perceive movements that advocate for change and object to
injustice. These issues and more pose several considerations: What criteria and biases do we
apply to our definitions of protests, riots, insurrections, and coups? What role does language play
in our understandings of conflict and protest, and how does it speak to wider questions of power
and hegemony? What processes have citizens used to promote institutional reform, and what
avenues have activists used when unable to proceed through conventional means? We invite
presentations that touch on these themes and topics across all geographic, methodological, and
temporal subfields of history, as well as interdisciplinary projects that address historical issues.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following:
• Methods of civil disobedience and protest.
• Perceptions and portrayals of public demonstrations.
• Insurrections, coups, and rebellions.
• The intersection of gender and race in the characterization of protests.
• Protests and riots in the ancient, pre-modern, and modern world.
Conference Details
The Annual History Graduate Student Association conference provides the opportunity for
graduate students to present and discuss their research with colleagues and peers, and to develop
their thoughts and ideas on important topics. Presentations will be grouped into panels in order to
facilitate greater discussion and interaction between scholars. Panels will consist of graduate
presenters, a graduate student commentator, and a faculty chair. The conference will feature a
series of morning and afternoon panels, as well as an address by a keynote speaker. No
registration fee is required. Format update: Due to multiple factors, we have decided that this
year’s conference will be held entirely online via Zoom.
Submission Requirements:
Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to umdgradhistconference@gmail.com
by Friday, February 4

th, 2022. If selected, participants will be asked to submit a ten-to-fifteen-
page final version of their paper closer to the date of the conference. Please include a résumé or

CV with your abstract submission. Please email Dustin Cranford at dcranfor@terpmail.umd.edu

or Evan Ash at erash@terpmail.umd.edu with questions. Proposal decision notifications will be
emailed by Friday, February 11th, 2022.


The course of human history is filled with instances of perseverance. Steady persistence of action and purpose, despite obstacles, difficulties, and discouragement, make for some of the most interesting and inspiring stories. For the 2022 HGSA Conference at Loyola University Chicago, we are thrilled to invite scholars, researchers, and students of any affiliation to share historical stories of perseverance on February 19th and 20th. The 2022 Conference will be hybrid. We are excited to consider submissions of Digital Humanities projects, research papers, Public History projects, museum exhibits, documentaries, as well as other formats. If we’ve learned anything from the trailblazers and underdogs of history, it is to push the limits and be creative.


Mapping the Early Modern World

NEH Summer Institute
July 18-August 12, 2022
Newberry Library

Application Deadline: March 1, 2022 

CRS is pleased to announce a professional development institute for higher education faculty, led by CRS Director Lia Markey and James Akerman, Director of the Herman Dunlop Smith Center for the History of Cartography at the Newberry.

Co-organized by the Newberry Library’s Smith Center for the History of Cartography and its Center for Renaissance Studies, and supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, this interdisciplinary institute is designed for non-specialists who have either worked with early modern maps in limited contexts, or who find themselves drawn to the subject for the first time. They will engage with the most recent scholarship, guided by faculty from multiple disciplines. The institute will be grounded in the Newberry’s remarkable collection of early modern cartographic resources and related materials, gaining insights into the complex contributions that the prolific archive of mapping made to transformations in the early modern world.

For more information about the institute, including eligibility requirements and instructions for submitting an application, please visit the program website here: https://mappingearlymodernworld22.wordpress.com/application-information/

Outside Events
Bloody Mary LIVE! (1).jpeg

You’re Invited: Bloody Mary: LIVE! at Club Cumming

Teen Queen Mary Tudor takes to the mic to rehab her “bloody” image in a gleefully vicious stand-up special. Join Bloody Mary as she tackles the drama every #queenager deals with: divorced parents, sibling rivalry and religious purges (…oops).

Written and performed by Olivia Miller, this smart, irreverent blend of stand-up comedy and a one-woman show was shortlisted for the 2020 Les Enfants Terribles Award and is fresh off a 5-star run in England with Assembly Festival (“Olivia Miller dazzles” – The Guardian).

Performed Jan 30 & Feb 9 at Club Cumming. Tickets are $15.

Learn more & book now here!
Miscellaneous (sublet offers; programs; new courses; etc.)

Columbia University Libraries is pleased to share our publishing partnership services and learning opportunities for the Spring 2022 semester!

Podcasting Partnerships

Ready to publish your own podcast? Check out the Libraries Podcasting Partnership program to see if our services are a fit for you! Applications for new partnerships are due Monday, March 14. 

Publish your Journal with Columbia University Libraries

Columbia Libraries’ open access journals program publishes 30 faculty and student-led journals in a variety of disciplines. For a complete look at our active publications and partnership model, browse our journal showcase and view our partnership program and application. The application deadline for Spring 2022 partnerships is Monday, February 7. 

Please reach out to publishing@library.columbia.edu with any questions about our programs. We look forward to hearing from you!


The Institute of Historical Research, National Hellenic Research Foundation

(Project Science & Orthodoxy around the World – SOW) 
and the Orthodox Academy of Crete
in collaboration with
the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens
are pleased to announce the organization of
the 2022 International Summer School on Science and Religion
on the island of Crete, Greece, from June 13 to 18, 2022
The one-week intensive summer school aims to provide participants with knowledge of the history of the relations between Christianity and Science as well as with an in-depth knowledge of the relations between Orthodox Christianity and Science. It is addressed to undergraduate and postgraduate students, Ph.D. candidates, and researchers in the field of Religion, Science, History, Philosophy, Technology, Didactics, Theology, as well as to those interested in the interconnection between religion and science. The instructors are researchers from various Greek and international prestigious research and educational institutions. 
The courses will be taught in English and will be offered to a limited number of applicants who will be selected by the summer-school scientific committee.
 For more information visit: 

Send events for posting (word .doc/docx preferred over .pdf) to <HISTORY@columbia.edu>

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