The Undergraduate Program


Seminars

Please note that students intending to write a senior thesis are strongly encouraged to enroll in a seminar for which they will write a substantial research paper during their junior year. Students should confirm with the seminar instructor that they will be asked to write a research paper. Please see pages 6 and 14-15 in the Undergraduate Handbook for more information

SPRING 2018 SEMINAR ENROLLMENT PROCEDURES

Undergraduate seminars that originate from the Department of History (at Columbia or Barnard) are grouped in three categories:

  • Seminars which require a departmental application. Students must file a seminar application with the department during the seminar application window. For spring 2018, the early registration application period is open from October 10th-November 2nd at 11:00 AM for priority admission. Students who apply by the priority deadline will be informed of their acceptance on November 9th. Applications received after the priority deadline will be responded to as soon as possible, but a response before early registration is not guaranteed.
  • Seminars which require instructor’s written or verbal permission (or an instructor-managed application). Students must email the instructor or visit their office hours to request permission. Many of these courses are blocked for registration; in these cases, students are required to join the waitlist in SSOL or myBarnard after getting permission. The instructor will then approve you in the course. (If you do not obtain permission for the seminars which require it, you may be removed from the waitlist or roster.)
  • Seminars which do not require instructor’s permission. Students may freely enroll until the course fills, or add themselves to a waitlist (most seminars are capped at 15).

Please note that graduate students may enroll in any 4000-level or above seminar, as well as a few 3000-level seminars with instructor’s permission.

UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS (APPLICATION REQUIRED; updated 10.16.17)
Last Updated: October 11th, 2017

The departmental seminar application period for the following spring 2018 seminars will be open from October 10th-November 2nd at 11:00 AM (for priority admission). To apply, please visit this link. Students who apply by the priority deadline will be informed of their acceptance on November 9th. Applications received after the priority deadline will be responded to as soon as possible, but a response before early registration is not guaranteed.


HIST UN3357 History of the Self: Montaigne: Mark Lilla, T 12:10-2 P [also open to graduate students via HIST GR6999]
This course is one of a series on the history of the modern self. The works of Montaigne, Pascal, Rousseau, Tocqueville, or another Enlightenment thinker are critically examined in a seminar setting. In Spring 2018, the topic is Montaigne.


HIST UN3429 Telling About the South: Barbara Fields, Th 4:10-6:00 P [also open to graduate students via HIST GR6999]
A remarkable array of Southern historians, novelists, and essayists have done what Shreve McCannon urges Quentin Compson to do in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!–tell about the South–producing recognized masterpieces of American literature.  Taking as examples certain writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the issues they confronted, the relationship between time during which and about they wrote, and the art of the written word as exemplified in their work.


HIST UN3xxx Wars for Indochina: Lien-Hang Nguyen, M 12:10-2:00 P [also open to graduate students via HIST GR6999]
This seminar will focus on the wars that ravaged Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos – the region often referred to as “Indochina” – in the latter half of the 20th Century.  This period in Indochinese history witnessed batttles for decolonization, revolutionary struggles, state and nation-building under the Cold War divide, superpower interventions, and fighting at the local, regional and global levels. Introducing students to the current debates in the field, students will become familiar with the rich historiography on this subject. In addition to weekly readings and discussions, students will write a research paper, based on a deep understanding of the secondary literature as well as a thorough analysis of primary sources.


HIST UN3928 Comparative Slavery and Emancipation in the Atlantic World: Natasha Lightfoot, M 2:10-4:00 P [also open to graduate students via HIST GR6999]
This seminar investigates the experiences of slavery and freedom among African-descended people living and laboring in the various parts of the Atlantic World. The course will trace critical aspects of these two major, interconnected historical phenomena with an eye to how specific cases either manifested or troubled broader trends across various slaveholding societies. The first half of the course addresses the history of slavery and the second half pertains to experiences in emancipation. However, since the abolition of slavery occurs at different moments in various areas of the Atlantic World, the course will adhere to a thematic rather than a chronological structure, in its examination of the multiple avenues to freedom available in various regions. Weekly units will approach major themes relevant to both slavery and emancipation, such as racial epistemologies among slaveowners/employers, labor regimes in slave and free societies, cultural innovations among slave and freed communities, gendered discourses and sexual relations within slave and free communities, and slaves’ and freepeople’s resistance to domination. The goal of this course is to broaden students’ comprehension of the history of slavery and freedom, and to promote an understanding of the transition from slavery to freedom in the Americas as creating both continuities and ruptures in the structure and practices of the various societies concerned. 

 

UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS (PERMISSION REQUIRED; updated 11.21.17)
Last Updated: November 21st, 2017

Please email professors or visit during their office hours to request permission. After receiving permission, you may enroll yourself during your next registration period (or join the course wait list in SSOL or myBarnard, if applicable; the instructor will then approve you). For course descriptions, please click on the course number. Note that if you do not secure permission from the instructor, you may be removed from the course.


HIST UN3180 Religious Conversion in Early Modern Europe: Elisheva Carlebach, T 12:10-2:00 P (ec607@columbia.edu for permission) [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HIST UN3437 Poisoned Worlds: Corporate Behavior and Public Health: David Rosner, W 8:10-10:00 A (dr289@cumc.columbia.edu for permission) [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

AMHS UN3580 American Cultural Criticism: Casey Blake, T 4:10-6:00 P (Attend first class to apply for permission)

HIST BC3316 Food and the Social Order in European History (sophomore seminar): Deborah Valenze, W 2:10-4:00 P (dvalenze@barnard.edu for permission)

HIST BC3491 Making Barnard History: Robert McCaughey, T 4:10-6:00 P (ram31@columbia.edu for permission)

HIST BC3504 Nineteenth Century New York City: A Spatial History (sophomore seminar): Gergely Baics, W 10:10-12:00 P (gbaics@barnard.edu for permission)

HIST BC3580 Mississippi Semester: Child Care, Race, and the History of Welfare (maximum enrollment of 6): Premilla Nadasen, M 2:10-4:00 P (pnadasen@barnard.edu for permission)

HIST BC3788 Gender, Sexuality, and Power from Colonial to Contemporary Africa: Abosede George, T 6:10-8:00 P (ageorge@barnard.edu for permission)

HIST UN3789 Histories of Poverty in Africa: Rhiannon Stephens, Th 10:10-12:00 P (r.stephens@columbia.edu for permission) [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HIST GU4110 French America 1534-1804: Pierre Force, T 2:10-4:00 P (pf3@columbia.edu for permission) 

HIST GU4223 Personality and Society in 19th C. Russian Thought: Richard Wortman, M 4:10-6:00 P (rsw3@columbia.edu for permission) 

HIST GU4509 Problems in International History: Anders Stephanson, T 4:10-6:00 P (ags8@columbia.edu for permission) 

HIST GU4811 Encounters With Nature: Environment and Health in South Asia and Beyond: Kavita Sivaramakrishnan, T 2:10-4:00 P (ks2890@cumc.columbia.edu for permission) 

UNDERGRADUATE SEMINARS (NO PERMISSION REQUIRED; updated 10.24.17)
Last Updated: October 24th, 2017

HIST UN3007 The Development of the Greek City-State: Richard Billows, Th 10:10-12:00 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999] 

HIST UN3225 Asiatic Russia: State and Society: Gulnar Kendirbai, W 12:10-2:00 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999] 

HIST UN3366 Intellectual Life in 19th C. Britain: Emily Jones, Th 10:10-12:00 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HIST UN3418 American Futures in the Progressive Era: Jarod Roll, M 12:10-2:00 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HIST UN3518 Columbia University and Slavery: Karl Jacoby, Th 12:10-2:00 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HIST UN3604 Jews in the City: Rebecca Kobrin, Th 2:10-4:00 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HIST UN3679 Mexico and the United States: Rachel Newman, W 2:10-4:00 P

HIST UN3708 The Ottomans and the World Around Them: A. Tunç Şen, Th 4:10-6 P [also open to grad students via HIST GR6999]

HSCL GU4607 Rabbis for Historians: Seth Schwartz, W 10:10-12:00 P

HIST GU4083 Crime and Punishment in the Middle Ages: Neslihan Senocak, W 10:10-12:00 A

HIST GU4311 Romanticism: Michael Stanislawski, Th 2:10-4:00 P

AMHS GU4403 The Sixties in the Archive: Thai Jones, T 10:10-12:00 P

CROSS-LISTED SEMINARS

Last Updated: 11/21/17

The following courses were approved to count towards the history major and concentration but do not originate from the department. Please consult the Directory of Classes for enrollment instructions.

  • RELI GU4370 History of Christianity: World of the First Crusade (Robert Somerville)

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