Catherine Evtuhov

Catherine Evtuhov

Professor

420 Fayerweather Hall
Phone: (212) 854-2420
Email: ce2308@columbia.edu

Education

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Russian and European History, 1991
M.A. University of California, Berkeley, Russian and European History, 1985
D.E.A. (equivalent to M.A.) Institut d'Etudes Politiques, Paris, Modern History, 1983
A.B. Harvard University, Social Studies, 1981

Interests and Research

Catherine Evtuhov specializes in the history of Russia, primarily in the imperial period. Her interests include the history of Russian thought in European context, material culture and local history, and the history of the Black Sea region and Russian-Ottoman relations. She is currently working on two books, Russia in the Age of Elizabeth (1741-61), and This Side of Good & Evil: Vladimir Soloviev for the 21st Century.

Courses

Graduate:
New Directions in Russian History (Spring 2014, Fall 2016)

Undergraduate:
History of Russia (lecture, Spring 2017)
The Black Sea in History (Fall 2016)
The Russian Revolution: 100 Years Later (Spring 2017)

Recent Awards

  • Rachel Carson Center Fellowship, Munich, Summer 2017.
  • British Leverhulme Trust Fellowship (with David Moon, Julia Lajus, and others), 2013-2016.
  • Fulbright Scholar Grant, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, 2012-13.
  • Wayne S. Vucinich prize (ASEEES) for Portrait of a Russian Province, 2012.

Selected Publications

Books

Portrait of a Russian Province: Economy, Society, and Civilization in Nineteenth-Century Nizhnii Novgorod.

A History of Russia: Peoples, Legends, Events, Forces.

The Cultural Gradient: the Transmission of Ideas in Europe, 1789-1991.

Sergei Bulgakov, Philosophy of Economy: the World as Household.

Kazan, Moscow, St. Petersburg: Multiple Faces of the Russian Empire.

The Cross & the Sickle: Sergei Bulgakov and the Fate of Russian Religious Philosophy, 1890-1920.

Affiliations

Member: American Historical Association; Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies; European Society for Environmental History; Phi Beta Kappa