News Archive

2014

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in The New York Times' piece: "How a Ferry Ride Helped Make Brooklyn the Original Suburb."

Charles Armstrong was quoted in New Republic's "Stop Making Fun of North Korea."

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in Reuters' "FEATURE-NYC Subway extension may transform Manhattan neighborhood."

Matthew Connelly was quoted in Newsweek's "How to Defuse the Population Bomb."

Robert Paxton was quoted in Bloomberg's "Paris Show on Nazi Collaboration Sheds Light on Dark Past."

"Black Lives Matter in Colombia," written by Yesenia Barragan, PhD Candidate, was featured in teleSUR.

"The Fabric of Our Lives," a piece written by Eric Herschthal, PhD Candidate, was featured in The Slate Book Review.

The US Embassy [Warsaw] will be hosting a reception in conjunction with Białostocki Ośrodek Kultury in honor of Rebecca Kobrin and the publication of her book Żydowski Białystok I Jego Diaspora(Borderland Publishers, 2014). The event will take place on December 10, 2014.

Małgorzata Mazurek in collaboration with the Universities of Exeter, Oxford, University College London, Leipzig and Belgrade, and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences has been awarded a major Arts and Humanities Research Council Grant (2014-18) entitled “Socialism Goes Global: Cold War Connections Between the ‘Second’ and ‘Third Worlds’ 1945-1991.” The grant will be used to address the relationship between what were once called the ‘Second World’ (from the Soviet Union to the GDR) and the ‘Third World’ (from Latin America to Africa to Asia).

Seven academics, two postdoctoral fellows and two PhDs will address both how socialist states in Europe crafted a global role for themselves in the post-war period, and how these international engagements reshaped socialist politics, societies and cultures ‘back home’. In doing so, it seeks to provide new insights into the circulation of ideas during the Cold War and to explore ‘the socialist world’ as a dynamic hub of global interactions during the second half of the twentieth century.  As part of this project Columbia University is planning an international workshop in 2016 entitled “Global Circuits of Expertise and the Making of the Post-45 World: Eastern European and Asian Perspectives."

David Rosner was featured in The Center for Public Integrity's "Internal documents reveal industry 'pattern of behavior' on toxic chemicals."

Elisheva Carlebach, Baron Professor of Jewish History, Culture and Society in the Departmentof History, Columbia University, is the recipient of the Association for Jewish Studies’ (AJS) 2014 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award in the category of Medieval and Early Modern Jewish History for her book, Palaces of Time: Jewish Calendar and Culture in Early Modern Europe (Harvard University Press).
According to the AJS, the prize “recognizes and promotes outstanding scholarship in the field of Jewish Studies and honor scholars whose work embodies the best in the field: rigorous research, theoretical sophistication, innovative methodology, and excellent writing.” The prize, awarded once in three years per category, will be presented on Sunday night December 14, 2014 at the AJS Conference in Baltimore.

A review onTocqueville's Nightmare, written by Noah Rosenblum, PhD Candidate, was featured in Society for U.s. Intellectual History.

"Apostles of Growth," a piece written by Timothy Shenk, PhD Candidate, was featured in The Nation

"Revolutionary rights," a piece written by Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins, PhD Candidate, was featured in The Times Literary Supplement.

PhD Candidate David Marcus has published an essay on Joseph O'Neil's The Dog in the Bookforum.

Mae Ngai was quoted in the New Republic's "I'm an Immigrant in America Thanks to Executive Action - Just Like Many of Your Ancestors Were."

Eric Foner was awarded the National Institute of Social Science's Gold Honor Medal, an honor that has been bestowed for 100 years. Other prominent people who have received this award in the past include Henry Kissinger and J. Edgar Hoover.

Manan Ahmed was awarded a grant from the Provost RFP on Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery.

Charles Armstrong was quoted in Bloomberg's "Korean Heroine Tortured by Japan Haunts Pages of History."

Mae Ngai was quoted in Financial Times' "America excels at absorbing not expelling."

Rashid Khalidi was featured in AlJazeera's "Guests: The Peace Process: Never and Forever."

Rashid Khalidi's piece "Why are Jerusalem's 300,000 Arabs rising up again?" is featured in Reuters.

Mae Ngai was quoted in Slate's "Obama's Immigration Overhaul Is Going to Be a Big Freakin' Deal."

Pamela Smith was elected Vice President of the Renaissance Society of America in 2014. Smith will be the Vice President for two years, then President 2016-2018, then Past President 2018-2020.

Gregory Mann was quoted in New York Observer's "The Stigma of Ebola Remains Virulent in New York's African Community."

Richard Bushman was quoted in The New York Times' "It's Official: Mormon Founder Had up to 40 Wives."

"Apostles of Growth," a piece written by Timothy Shenk, PhD Candidate, was featured in The Nation.

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in Capital New York's piece "Fulton Center opens, monumentally."

"Looking to Science for Answers About Race," a piece by Michael Yudell, Mailman School of Public Health PhD, was featured in Time.

Volker Berghahn's review on Robert Beachy's Gay Berlin was featured in The New York Times' Sunday Book Review.

The following Department of History faculty members will be recognized on Wed. Oct. 29th at the Faculty Distinction Reception: Elizabeth Blackmar, Eric Foner, Carol Gluck, Kenneth Jackson, Karl Jacoby, Alice Kessler-Harris, Rashid Khalidi, Natasha Lightfoot, Susan Pedersen, Christine Philliou.

Natasha Lightfoot has been selected as an honoree for Community News Group's event '40 Under 40.' CNG operates the largest circulation of weekly newspapers in the NY market.

The Department warmly congratulates Charles Armstrong, Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, on his receipt of theAmerican Historical Association's John K. Fairbank Prize for 2014 for his book, Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950 - 1992. Established by a gift to the Association from the friends of the prominent historian of China and East Asia at Harvard and President of the Association in 1968, the John K. Fairbank Prize is awarded for the best work on the history of China proper, Vietnam, Chinese Central Asia, Mongolia, Manchuria, Korea, or Japan since the year 1800.

Nick Juravich, PhD Candidate, was awarded the Metropolitan College Scholar-in-Residence, a new voluntary fellowship created by the Academic Council of Metropolitan College of New York.

John Coatsworth was quoted in The New York Times' "Ebola Prompts Universities to Tighten Travel Rules."

Madeleine Zelin was honored at a confernece titled "Beyond Mondernity: Understanding Change in China," at Columbia on September 19 and 20, 2014.

David Rosner was quoted in The Washington Post's "CDC director's challenge: Deadly Ebola virus and outbreak of criticism" and The Nation's "The Brain Cancer Rate for Girls in This Town Shot Up 550% - Is a Defense Contract to Blame?"

Rashid Khalidi was quoted in PBS NewsHour's "Islamic State group uses only half of a Quran verse to justify beheadings - see what's in the other half."

Charles Armstrong was interviewed on CNN regarding Kim Jong-un.

Kenneth Jackson was featured in Columbia News' piece, "An All-Night Bike Ride Through New York City's History."

David Marcus, PhD Candidate, was appointed co-editor, of Dissent.

"Ferguson is the Afterlife of Slavery in the Americas," a piece written by Yesenia Barragan, PhD Candidate, was featured in Telesur.

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned in The Wall Street Journal's "A Sage, Once Reviled, Now Is China's Brand."

Eric Foner's book review titled, "A Brutal Process: 'The Half Has Never Been Told,' by Edward E. Baptist," was featured in The New York Times.

The Dean's Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities presents "Science, Art, and Medicine: A Historian in the Laboratory," a lecture by Pamela Smith on Oct. 13th, 4:30pm in the alumni Auditorium (650 WEst 168th St. First Floor). For inquiries, please contact Natalie Ross 212-304-7216 or nr2344@columbia.edu.

Peter Awn was quoted in CNN's "Anti-Islam Ads Hit New York Streets."

Richard John was quoted in The New York Times' "Why We Sit Back and Let Apps Do Our Chores."

David Weiman was awarded this year's Jonathan Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching, a prestigious prize conferred annually by the Economic History Assocation.

Eric Foner was featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education's piece, "Time for the New Fall Season - for TV and for MOOCs."

Mamadou Diouf was presented by French Minister Laurent Fabius with the insignia of Chevalier of the Legion of Honor.

Ijeoma Eboh, a student of Barbara Fields, was recently crowned Miss Harlem Shake 2014. More information can be found in Harlem Condo Life's article "Introducing Miss Harlem Shake 2014 Ijeoma Eboh."

David Rosner took part in "Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change to Host Discussion on History of Deception and Denial by Big Industries." A video to the panel discussion can be found here.

David Rosner will give a talk in Paris on Sept. 23rd titled "Law and (American) Order: A Historian Looks at the Workplace, the Worker and American Justice."

The New York Times featured a piece on Kenneth Jackson and his all-night bicycle ride tour of NYC as part of his course "History of the City of New York." The piece, titled, "Taking a Spin Through New York City's History," can be found here.

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in The Wall Street Journal's "Ex-Bloomberg Aides Strike Back Against de Blasio."

On Oct. 2nd, Hilary Hallett, Sarah Cole, and Sharon Marcus will hold a discussion titled "Trans-Atlantic Celebrity: H.G. Wells, Elinor Glyn, and Sarah Bernhardt." More information on the event can be found here.

Eugenia Lean was chosen as a recipient of the 2013-2014 Faculty Mentoring Award for faculty in the Graduate School of Arts and  Sciences (GSAS). The Graduate Student Advisory Council instituted this award in 2004 to commemorate excellence in the mentoring of Ph.D.  students. This award is a student initiative; selections were made entirely by graduate student representatives from GSAS and affiliated schools. 

Gray Tuttle was awarded tenure in 2014. He was also awarded a Collaborative Reading Workshop Grant from the Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies for Spring 2015.

Mark Carnes' new book Minds on Fire was released by Harvard University Press.

David Rothman was quoted in The Wall Street Journal's "Not Every Conflict of Interest Produces the Same Vote on FDA Panels."

Eric Foner was quoted in New York Magazine's "7 Summers From History Worse Than This One.

Mark Lilla was quoted in The New York Times's "Becoming a Real Person."

Charles Armstrong was quoted in The Seattle Times's "Editorial: Kenneth Bae, North Korea and a new opportunity to talk."

Hilary Hallett's piece "Back to School in Ferguson" was featured on Pacific Standard.

"Jokowi's Way," a piece written by Thomas Meaney, PhD Candidate, and Saskia Schaefer, was featured onThe Nation.

PhD Candidates Westenley Alcenat, Yesenia Barragan, and Eric Herschthal are organizing a one-day workshop at Columbia, "Reworking Freedom: Graduate Student Workshop on Re-Centering the Enslaved in Histories of the Americas" on October 17.

CCNMTL and EdX Launching Professor Eric Foner's Civil War MOOC: Trailer Released.

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in The New York Times' "350 Years Ago, New Amsterdam Became New York. Don't Expect a Party."

Rebecca Korbin’s piece, “A Century-Old Lesson in Better Banking was featured in Bloomberg View

Tarik Amar appeared on TRT's Küresel Bakış 27 August program on the crisis in Ukraine.

Rashid Khalidi was quoted in The Atlantic’s “How Middle East Studies Professors Handle Bias in the Classroom

Volker Berghahn was quoted in Life’s “A Box of WWII Souvenirs Yields a Trove of Nazi Creation Myths

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in Bloomberg's "Ferguson Shows U.S. Impulse to Kill Cities in Search for Growth."

Mae Ngai was quoted in Politico's "Behind the White House Maneuvering On Migrants."

Mae Ngai was quoted in The Boston Globe's "The Myths of Illegal Immigration."

Tarik Amar was mentioned in The Washington Post's "Why Ukrainian Politicians Keep Beating Each Other Up."

Carol Gluck was appointed Cleveringa Professor at Leiden, 2014-15.

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned in The Chronicle's "Israeli Scholar Says Outcry Over His Rape Remarks has Not Hurt Planned U.S. Tour."

Mercantilism Reimagined, co-edited by Carl Wennerlind and Philip J. Stern, was reviewed in The TLS.

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned in the Truth-Out's "The War Over the War: Israel, Gaza and American Protest."

Casey Blake participates in the program Double Discovery Center which was mentioned in The New York Times' The Opinion Pages: "Plato and the Promise of College."

"Santos Won, But When Will Peace Win in Colombia?" a piece by Yesenia Barragan, PhD Candidate, was featured in teleSUR.

"El Monte's Hicks Camp: A Mexican Barrio," a piece by Daniel Morales, PhD Candidate, was featured on KCET.

Rashid Khalidi's piece "Collective Punishment in Gaza" was featured in The New Yorker.

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned in Vice News' piece, "Why Talk of Intifada? We Should Call It a Palestinian Uprising."

Mae Ngai was featured in The Boston Globe's "The Myth of Illegal Immigration."

Interview with David Rothman on the changing approaches to death and dying in the United States was featured in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Emeritus Professor István Deák's Letter to the Editor was featured in The Opinion Pages of The New York Times: "Looking Back at World War I and the Hapsburgs."

Richard Bulliet's piece, "It's Good to Be the Caliph," was featured on Politico.

History Department Senior Thesis Workshop in Paris.  With support from the President's Global Innovation Fund and in partnership with the Columbia Global Center Paris and the Columbia University Libraries, the History Department has begun a program to enhance the senior thesis by providing support for students doing primary research in European archives.  Seven rising seniors received grants to conduct research on topics ranging from thirteenth century women's religiosity, to fugitive slaves in the Spanish empire, to the 1984-5 British coal miners' strike, to French influences on Allan Bloom (to mention just a few).  After fanning out into archives and libraries in France, Britain, Spain and the Netherlands, the students came together with the program's faculty and graduate student coordinators for a workshop on their early findings and future research strategies at the Global Center Paris on July 16-18.

Rashid Khalidi was interviewed by The Majority Report with Sam Seder. The podcast "The Occupation & Racism & America's Complicity" can be found here.

A book review written by Ana Isabel Keilson, PhD Candidate, has been published in the Spring 2014 issue of Dane Research Journal.

Hilary Hallett's piece "Why Do Men Dislike Erotica for Women So Much?" was featured on Pacific Standard.

Rashid Khalidi's piece "Israel's Assault on Gaza Obscures Core Issues: Racism, Occupation, Colonization," was featured on AlterNet.

Marc Van De Mieroop was mentioned in Fox News' piece "Remains of Long-Lost Temple Discovered in Iraq."

Alice Kessler-Harris took part in Interuniversity for the European-American History and Politics (CISPEA)'s International Workshop: "Shifting Notions of Social Citizenship: The 'Two Wests'" in Ried Hall, Paris. Participants included George Aumoithe, Nick Juravich, and Suzanne Kahn, PhD Candidates.

Matthew Connelly's piece "The 'Documentary Big Bang' in Nuclear Weapons Scholarship" was featured in The Washington Post.

Eric Foner was mentioned in STL Today's piece, "Editorial: A Celebration of Freedom. Interpretations May Vary."

Ways of Making and Knowing: The Material Culture of Empirical Knowledge edited by Pamela Smith, Amy Meyers, and Harold Cook has been published by University of Michigan Press.

David Rothman was mentioned in Pacific Standard's piece "The Organ Detective: A Career Spent Uncovering a Hidden Global Market in Human Flesh."

Dr. Felix V. Matos Rodriguez has been appointed President of Queens College. Dr. Rodriguez received his Ph.D. in History from Columbia University.

Charly Coleman's new book The Virtues of Abandon has been released.

Mae Ngai was interviewed by Columbia News in "Mae Ngai Provides Critical Context for the History of Immigration and Labor in U.S."

Mark Mazower was mentioned in The New York Times' "World War I Conference in Sarajevo Divides Scholars."

"Ricardo Flores Magón and the Anarchist Movement in Southern California," a piece written by Yesenia Barragan, PhD Candidate, and Mark Bray, was featured on KCET.org.

Fritz Stern's piece, "The European Elections," was featured in The New York Times's The Opinion Pages.

Eric Foner was mentioned in Financial Times's "An all-American cheer for populism."

David Rothman was mentioned in Associated Press's piece, "Doctors Lean More Left, Political Donations Show," and The New York Times's piece, " Doctors Aren't Strongly Republican Anymore."

Kenneth Jackson was mentioned in Crains New York's piece, "Rare common ground found in landmarking debate."

Eric Foner was featured in US News' piece "The New Separate and Unequal: Sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education, schools are still segregated."

"What Was Democracy?" written by Thomas Meaney, PhD Candidate, and Yascha Mounk, was featured on The Nation.

Mae Ngai was awarded the 2013-2014 Alliance Joint Project grant.

Claire Eddington, a student at the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health, who received her PhD in 2013 from SMS and the History Department, was awarded the Pressman-Burroughs-Wellcome Award by the American Association for the History of Medicine. The award is made for an outstanding dissertation and proposal to become a publishable monograph. Claire is currently a Post-Doc at Harvard University.

A short essay by Eric Frith, PhD Candidate, titled "Rebellion Against the Mission of the Saintly Prince the Archangel, San Gabriel of the Temblors" appeared on KCET.org as part of East of East, a transnational/community archival project co-founded by doctoral candidate Romeo Guzmán.

Simon Stevens, PhD Candidate, was mentioned in PRI's piece "Need a cover for your book about Africa? Just add an acacia tree."

Susan Pedersen was awarded the Great Teacher Award by Society of Columbia Graduates.

Divya Cherian, PhD candidate, was selected as a Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellow for 2014. The Newcombe Fellowship is the nation's largest and most prestigious such award for PhD candidates in the humanities and social sciences addressing questions of ethical and religious values.

Eugenia Lean was awarded the 2013-2014 Faculty Mentoring Award for faculty in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS).

Secularism and Religion in Nineteenth-Century Germany: The Rise of the Fourth Confession, written by Todd Weir, 2005 PhD, was released by Cambridge University Press.

"'City of Achievement': The Making of the City of South El Monte, 1955-1976," a piece by Nick Juravich, was featured on KCET. East of East, a transnational, multi-disciplinary archive project based in the communities of South El Monte and El Monte, California, is now featured on KCET. East of East was co-founded by doctoral candidate Romeo Guzmán and features contributions from several graduate students in the History Department.

Eric Foner will be awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters at Dartmouth College in June.

Christopher Brown was mentioned in The New York Times' "A Potrait and the History It Holds."

David Rosner was awarded the McGovern prize by Sigma Xi, the honorary science society. Rosner's interview with American Scientist, their journal, can be found here.

Simon Schama was featured on CNNWorld's Fareed Zakaria GPS: "Was Anti-Semitism an Idea Exported from Europe?"

Pamela Smith was mentioned on OnlinePhDProgram.org's feature "Learn from the Best: 100 Notable Professors at Top Research University."

The following History undergraduate students have been awarded summer grants to fund research for their thesis projects in European archives and libraries: Nicole Cademartori, David Froomkin, Isabel Genecin, Jake Hamburger, Rachel Hodes, Farin Kautz, and Olivia Lemons. This initiative is being generously supported by the President's Global Innovation Fund.

"Thomas Piketty and Millennial Marxists on the Scourge of Inequality," a piece by Timothy Shenk, PhD candidate, was featured in The Nation.

Stephen J. Sullivan, 2013 PhD, was selected to receive the 2014 Mary K. Bonsteel Tachau Teacher of the Year Award from the Organization of American Historians.

Karl Jacoby was awarded a Fellowship by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Deborah Coen was awarded Fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the ACLS, and the Cullman Center.

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned in The New York Times' "Brandeis Cancels Plan to Give Honorary Degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Critic of Islam."

Kenneth Jackson was mentioned in The New York Times' "In a Tale of the Nation's First Spy Ring, a Spotlight on Colonial New York."

"Beyond Indecision: A young novelist goes left and gets serious," a piece by David Marcus, PhD Candidate, was featured in Book Forum.

Martha Howell will deliver the Gray Boyce Memorial Lecture on April 9th, 4pm at The Richard Leopold Room. Her talk title is "The Dangers of Dress: The Regulation of Dress in Late Medieval Europe."

"My Father's Charreria, My Rodeo," a piece by Romeo Guzmán, PhD candidate, was featured in Boom: A Journal of California.

Rashid Khalidi was awarded the Lionel Trilling Award, a prize given by the Columbia College Academic Awards Committee for the best book published by the faculty in the last calendar year, for Brokers of Deceit: How the U.S. Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East.

"Why Collecting Butterlies Isn't Cruel," by William Leach was featured in The Wall Street Journal.

Eric Foner was mentioned in The New York Times' "Determining the Legal Rights of Slaves."

Evan Haefeli was interviewed on the Dutch Origins of Religious Tolerance by Research on Religion.

Kenneth Jackson was quoted in The Wall Street Journal's "Carriage Horses, Now Controversial, Have a Long City History."

Simon Schama was featured in The New York Times' "The Historical Becomes Personal."

"Supporting Ukraine Means Opposing Anti-Semitic Nationalism Now, Not Later," an article co-authored by Tarik Amar, was featured in Tablet.

Tarik Amar was quoted in El Confidencial's "Los héroes 'ultras' de la revolución ucraniana."

Tarik Amar was interviewed by The Real News in "Should Ukraine and West Accept De Facto Crimea Joining Russia."

Simon Schama appeared on "Charilie Rose: Simon Schama on Jewish History," and was featured in The Jerusalem Post's "With 'The Story of the Jews,' Simon Schama Returns to His Roots."

The Story of the Jews by Simon Schama was reviewed by Michael Hiltzik in the LA Times.

Acclaimed work Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Timeby Ira Katznelson will be awarded the 2014 Bancroft Prize.

Tarik Amar was quoted in Philly.Com's piece, "Worldview: On Ukraine, Stay Calm."

Eric Foner appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart for their segment "The Weakest Lincoln."

"The Swaddling Thesis," a review of Peter Mandler's Return from the Natives, written by Thomas Meaney, PhD candidate, was featured in the London Review of Books.

Tarik Amar was mentioned in Al Jazeera's piece, "Taking Charge of the New Ukraine."

Nara Milanich was awarded the ACLS/Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship for Recently Tenured Scholars for 2014-15.

Timothy Shenk, PhD candidate, was interviewed by New Books in Intellectual History on his new book Maurice Dobb: Political Economist.

Deborah Coen's piece, "The First Cold War," was featured in Foreign Affairs.

"How Blacks Freed Themselves from Slavery," a review written by Eric Herschthal, PhD Candidate, was featured in The Daily Beast.

"Ideas," a piece written by Sam Moyn and Darrin M. McMahon, was featured in The Chronicle.

Simon Schama is to be the next guest at the Hay-Adams Author Series on March 27

Robert Neer, Lecturer in Discpline, was a panelist on CrossTalk: Loser Presidents. Neer's book Napalm also received a "Worth a Second Look" double review in the Journal of Military History and was featured in New Books in Biography.

Richard Bulliet was mentioned in Time World's piece, "The Mystery of the Bible's Phantom Camels."

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned in the Huffington Post's piece, "Washington's Military Aid to Israel: Fake Peace Process, Real War Process."

David Rosner was mentioned in the Huffington Post's piece, "Public Health Advocates Find Flame Retardant Fight Follows Familiar Formula."

Mark Mazower's piece, "Baby Boomers Have Failed a Doomed Generation," was featured in Financial Times.

Charles Armstrong was mentioned in CSMonitor's piece "US-South Korea Joint Military Exercises - Three Things You Need to Know."

Kenneth Jackson was mentioned in The Observer's piece "Build a Monument to the Future on Roosevelt Island."

Eric Foner was mentioned in The Chronicle's piece "The Long Reach of David Brion Davis."

Rashid Khalidi is quoted in CNNMoney's piece, "Scarlett Johansson will not solvce SodaStream's troubles."

Mae Ngai's op-ed piece, "Second-Class Noncitizens," is featured in The New York Times.

Eric Foner was quoted in the Huffington Post's piece, "Maryland Legislature Reconsiders Pro-Slavery 'Shadow Amendment.'"

Kenneth Jackson was mentioned in the Associated Press's piece "'I'm Walkin' Here!' NYC Takes Aim at Jaywalking."

Rashid Khalidi was mentioned inthe New York Times' "Scarlett Johansson's Defense of SodaStream Factory in Occupied West Bank Fails to Sway Critics."

"The Ghost Files," an article on Matthew Connelly's work, has been featured in Columbia Magazine.

Elizabeth Blackmar and Christine Philliou were awarded the Lenfest Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award.

William V. Harris discussed mental illness in The Atlantic's piece, "Diagnosing Mental Illness in Anicent Greece and Rome."

Sam Moyn's review of David Bosco's book Rough Justice was featured in The Wall Street Journal.

"How to End Lead Wars in America," an op-ed piece by David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, was featured in The Huffington Post.

Eric Foner was interviewed by The Atlantic in "'You Have to Know History to Actually Teach It.'"

Rashid Khalidi was featured in CNN Press Room's "Mideast Violence on CNN's Fareed Zakaria GPS."

Marwa Elshakry was interviewed on her new book Reading Darwin in Arabic, 1860-1950 on Ottoman History Podcast.

Susan Pedersen will be giving the Ford Lectures at Oxford University in Hilary Term 2014.  The series of six lectures is titled "International and Empire: British Dilemmas, 1919-1939" and will be held Fridays at 5pm in Examination Schools.   The first lecture, "Turning to Geneva," will take place on January 31st.  All are welcome.

Reading Darwin in Arabic, 1860-1950, written by Marwa Elshakry, has been published by the University of Chicago Press.

William Harris was featured in "Professor Probes Mental Disorders in the Ancient World," in ColumbiaNews.

Charles Armstrong was featured in The New York Times' piece, "Rodman Leading Team of Improbable Emissaries."

Kenneth Jackson was featured in The Wall Street Journal's article "Winter Storm Headed for New York."

Maurice Dobb: Political Economist, written by Timothy Shenk, PhD candidate, has been published by Palgrave Macmillan.

David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz was featured on Moyers & Company's "A Win for Children's Health."

2013

"North Korea's Family Purge," a piece written by Charles Armstrong, was featured on OpenDemocracy.

David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz were a part of a landmark lawsuit on behalf of several cities in California against the lead industry. The ruling has just come down and the companies have been ordered to pay $1.1 billion to the cities to remove lead paint from the walls of older houses. Much of the historical evidence was from the research they did for their books Lead Wars and Deceit and Denial. Two of the recent news reports can be found in this CBS news link and in Philly's "$1.1 billion is merely the headline in momentous California lead paint case."

Pamela Smith was featuerd in Columbia Record's piece: "Mining the History of Science."

Casey Blake was featured in Columbia Record's piece: "'The Armory Show at 100' is Recreating New York's Epic Encounter with Modernity."

Alice Kessler-Harris was quoted in The Chronicle's "Scholars Debate Significance of American Studies Assn.'s Vote to Boycott Israel."

Charles Armstrong was quoted in the Associated Press' "NKorea Explodes Myth of Unchallenged Kim Dynasty."

As of Jan. 1, 2014, Pamela Smith will become Seth Low Professor of History. Volker Berghahn will become the Seth Low Professor Emeritus of History.

Charles Armstrong was quoted in the New York Times' "Grasping for Clues in North Korean Execution, Bloomberg News' "Kim Jong Un Executes Uncle Quelling Doubts He's in Charge," and NPR's "Was North Korea's No. 2 Killed For Not Clapping Hard Enough?"

Charles Armstrong was quoted in Bloomberg News' article, "North Korea Executes Purged Uncle of Leader Kim Jong Un," The Wall Street Journal's "With Jang Execution, North Korea Lurches Into Unchartered Waters," and the New York Times' "Execution Raises Doubts About Kim's Grip on North Korea."

Moses Finley and Politics, edited by William V. Harris, which includes contributions by Alice Kessler-Harris and Seth Schwartz, has been released.

"Ricardo Flores Magón and the Anarchist Movement in El Monte, California," co-authored by PhD Candidate Yesenia Barragan, Mark Bray, and Alvaro Marquez, appeared on Tropics of Meta. This is the first published entry from the forthcoming anthology "East of East: Mapping Community Narratives in South El Monte and El Monte," produced in collaboration with the South El Monte Arts Posse and edited by PhD Candidate Romeo Guzmán and department alumni Alex Sayf Cummings and Ryan Reft. Several PhD candidates are contributing to this project.

"A Civil War, by Claudio Pavone," a review by Mark Mazower, was featured in The Financial Times.

"Power Down: The humanitarian impulse has not vanished from US foreign policy. It has simply split into two camps," a piece by Thomas Meaney, PhD candidate, was featured in The Nation.

Timothy Shenk, PhD candidate, was chosen as a winner of GSAS's 2014 Summer Teaching Scholars Program for his proposal, "Origins of the Economy."

Eric Foner was interviewed by NPR on the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address: "Putting Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in its Original Context."

Book Culture is hosting a talk by Charles Armstrong and book signing of his latest book Tyranny of the Weak on 112th St. at 7:00pm on Monday, December 9th.

Sean O'Neil, PhD student, is a recipient of The Alliance Program's Doctoral Mobility Grant for 2014-15.

Casey Blake was featured in The Wesleyan's Connection: "Blake '78 Is Historian for Modern Art Centennial 'The Armory Show.'"

Charles Armstrong was featured on Inside Higher Ed's "The Psy Impact."

Mark Lilla was featured on The Chronicle's "The Would-Be Philosopher-King."

"The Passion of Solomon Northup," written by Eric Herschthal, PhD Candidate, was featured in the New York Times.

Carl Wennerlind's new book Mercantilism Reimagined has been released.

Professor Emerita Caroline Walker Bynum was awarded the Grosses Verdienstkreuz mit Stern (Grand Merit Cross with Star) of the Federal Republic of Germany by President Joachim Gauck in October 2013.   Because she was unable to travel to Germany for the ceremony, the Cross was presented to her on November 4 by Consul General Busso von Alvensleben on the occasion of a dinner in New York for the American Academy in Berlin, on the Board of which Professor Bynum serves.

Eric Foner was featured on NPR's "The Racial History of the 'Grandfather Clause.'"

Eric Foner was featured in the New York Times' "An Essentially American Narrative: A Discussion of Steve McQueen's Film '12 Years a Slave.'"

History Department wins grant to provide summer grants and research support for undergraduates writing senior theses. The History Department is delighted to announce the receipt of a major three-year grant ($75,000 per year) from the President's Global Innovation Fund, which will be used to provide expanded research opportunities for undergraduate History majors doing senior theses on European history topics or on topics in other fields using sources from European archives.   This program, which is being led by Professors Susan Pedersen and Pamela Smith, will allow some eight to ten rising seniors to conduct four to six weeks of research in European archives.  The grant will also support supplemental workshop and mentoring activities throughout the year culminating in a three-day workshop in July for these students, two graduate student mentors, and two Columbia faculty members at the Columbia Global Center Europe (CGE) in Paris.  Paul LeClerc, Director of the Global Center Europe, and Barbara Rockenbach and John Tofanelli, respectively director of the Humanities and History libraries, and research librarian for the Anglo-American collections at Columbia, have generously agreed to partner with us in developing this pilot program.  The program will also draw on the resources of Global Center Istanbul as well as an extensive network of contacts and collaborations throughout Europe.

Casey Blake was featured in the Columbia Daily Spectator: "'Armory Show' Takes Visitors Back to 1913 Scandal" and the New York Times: "Reliving the Show That 'Dropped Like a Bomb.'"

Casey Blake is Senior Historian for "The Armory Show at 100," an exhibition at the New-York Historical Society on the occasion of the centennial of the 1913 show that introduced Americans to artistic modernism.  The exhibition runs from October 11, 2013 to February 23, 2014.

Andrew Lebovich, African History PhD student, has recently published "Handbook on the Mali Crisis" (ISITA, Northwestern), co-authored with Alex Thurston. The guide is available here.

"On Marshall Berman," a piece written by David Marcus, PhD Candidate, was featured on n+1.

William V. Harris's new book The Ancient Mediterranean Environment Between Science and History has been released by BRILL.

East-Central Europe Past and Present has featured an extended profile on The Life and Career of Professor István Deák.

Manuel A. Bautista González, PhD candidate, has been elected as member of the Executive Committee of the Mexican Economic History Association (AMHE) for 2013-2016. To date, he is the youngest member ever to be elected to the AMHE's governing board.

Rhiannon Stephens's new book A History of African Motherhood: The Case of Uganda, 700-1900 has been released by Cambridge University Press.

"The Colonist of Good Will: On Albert Camus," a piece written by Thomas Meaney, PhD candidate, was featured on The Nation.

The South El Monte Arts Posse, an interdisciplnary arts collective co-directed by Romeo Guzman, PhD candidate, was awarded a Los Angeles City Department of Cultural Affairs Exchange International Grant as well as a National Performance Network grant for their project "East of East: Mapping Community Narrativecs in South El Monte and El Monte." KCET recently wrote a piece about their project.

Martha Howell's interview "Commerce Before Capitalism in Europe, 1300-1600," was featured on New Books in History.

Mae Ngai was a panelist on “Why Citizenship Matters,” a forum on immigration reform and citizenship.

Samuel Roberts's piece, "Challenging Punishment: What the California Prisoners' Hunger Strike Tells Us About Mass Incarceration," was featured in Huffington Post.

What good is a degree in History? "The Humanities in Dubious Battle: What a new Harvard report doesn't tell us," by Anthony T. Grafton and James Grossman.

Mae Ngai was appointed a Named Chair in the School of History and Culture, Northeastern Normal University, Changchun, Jilin, China.

"Revolution Blues: Why do popular histories of the War of Independence ignore modern scholarship?," a piece written by Eric Herschthal, PhD Candidate, was featured on Slate.

Sam Moyn was named Bryce Professor of European Legal History, and Nick Dirks was named Franz Boas Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Professor Emeritus of History.

Charles Armstrong's new book Tyranny of the Weak has been released by Cornell University Press.

Greg Mann's piece, "Madiba, Maliba (and me)," was featured on Africa is a Country.

Eric Foner discussed the Civil War in "Lincoln's Journey," which aired on BackstoryRadio, a public radio show.

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences released a report on the state of the humanities and social sciences, "The Heart of the Matter." It argues for the central place of historical research and training, highlighting the crucial role that historical thinking plays in public life.

The program of "Studies of the Dutch-speaking world," funded in part by the Nederlandse Taalunie (the Queen Wilhelmina Visiting Professorship program), now has a website: dutchworld.columbia.edu. The program is managed by faculty and staff of the History Department in cooperation with the Department of Germanic Languages and a faculty committee representing several disciplines.

"Symposium: The Legacy of Lewis S. Feuer," written by Ben Serby, PhD Candidate, was published by SOCIETY.

The Barnard History Department is delighted to announce the appointment of Premilla Nadasen.  Professor Nadasen received her  Ph.D. in American History at Columbia in 1999.  Her research focuses on African-American working-class women’s history. Her first book, Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States (2005), examines African-American welfare activists; she is currently working on a history of the domestic rights movement in the US. She will teach a range of courses on African-American, gender, and labor history, including, this fall, “American Women in the Twentieth Century.”

Ira Katznelson's new book Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time was released by W.W. Norton.

"Why it took decades of blaming parents before we banned lead paint," an article written by David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, was featured on The Atlantic.

"America is poisonous to your health," an article written by David Rosner, was featured on Salon.

David Rosner was recently interviewed on Moyers & Company as well as on The Leonard Lopate Show.

A study described at smallworldhistory.org website has just been released that ranks Columbia Department of History second after SOAS in a survey of US, Canada, and UK history departments.
http://www.smallworldhistory.org/Its_a_Small_World_After_All/Rankings.html

Mae Ngai was interviewed on PBS NewsHour: "How Do Low-Skilled Workers Fit Into Equation of Immigration Reform?"

"Ghosts of Party Past: New York's Last Two Democratic Mayors and the 2013 Election," an article written by Nick Juravich, PhD Candidate, was featured on Dissent.

The Power of Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, co-edited by Martha Howell, has been release.

Eric Foner was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the State University of New York

Carol Gluck was chosen as a recipient of the 2012-2013 Faculty Mentoring Award for faculty in the Graduate School of Arts and  Sciences (GSAS). The Graduate Student Advisory Council instituted this award in 2004 to commemorate excellence in the mentoring of Ph.D.  students. This award is a student initiative; selections were made entirely by graduate student representatives from GSAS and affiliated schools. The Faculty Mentoring Award will be formally presented at this year's Ph.D.  Convocation on May 19th.

"Empire States: On Pankaj Mishra," an article written by Thomas Meaney, PhD Candidate, was featured on The Nation.

"Mali: Which Way Forward?" A chat with Bruce Hall, Baz Lecocq, Gregory Mann and Bruce Whitehouse can be found on African Arguments.

"Pakistan's Tyrannical Majority," written by Manan Ahmed, was featured in The Opinion Pages of The New York Times.

Alan Brinkley's piece "Fighting the Gun World," has been featured on Reuters' The Great Debate.

Karl Jacoby has been quoted in The Wall Street Journal's article "The Feud That Keeps on Giving."

Samuel Moyn's article "Why the Court Was Right About the Alien Tort Statute" was featured on Foreign Affairs.

The Department of History congratulates Professor Barbara J. Fields on receiving a 2013 Columbia University Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching.  This is just the latest in an impressive string of awards--including a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellows Award in 1992--for her work on the history of the American South, focusing particularly on the history of the Civil War and Reconstruction.  In 2012, Professor Fields published a widely reviewed book with Karen Fields, Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life (New York: Verso, 2012).  The Department chose this book as the sole work by a departmental faculty member to be taught as part of the Department’s Historiography and Methods course required of all first-year graduate students.   This year, Professor Fields is incoming President of the Southern Historical Association. 

"Was Slavery as Harmful in the North as It Was in the South," a book review written by Eric Herschthal, PhD Candidate, has been featured on The Daily Beast.

Rashid Khalidi critiques U.S. role in MidEast Peace Process in PBS's "Has the U.S. Undermined Middle East Peace?"

Mark Mazower's article, "No Exit?: Greece's Ongoing Crisis," was featured on The Nation

William V. Harris' new book, Mental Disorders in the Classical World, has been released.

Gregory Mann was featured in the Washington Post article "Niger rapidly emerges as a key U.S. partner in anti-terrorism fight in Africa."

"Post-Hysterics: Zadie Smith and the Fiction of Austerity," written by David Marcus, PhD Candidate, was featured in Dissent.

Rhiannon Stephens has been named a MacDonald Summer Fellow for 2013.

David Rosner's new book, Lead Wars, has been released.

"Hunter-Blatherer: On Jared Diamond," a new piece by PhD candidate, Stephen Wertheim was featured in The Nation.

Robert Neer, Core Lecturer, was interviewed by TIME Magazine: "Napalm: A True American Tale."

Marc Van De Mieroop and Lynn Garafola have been awarded Guggenheim Fellowships. As also mentioned in Columbia University's ON CAMPUS.

William Leach's new book, Butterfly People, has been released.

Mae Ngai spoke at a Congressional briefing on Immigration History on April 5. The video can be viewed here.

Core Lecturer Robert Neer's widely reviewed new book, Napalm, An American Biography, was selected by Publisher's Weekly as one of the Best New Books of the week. Neer was also interviewed on WBUR, a Boston NPR affiliate, and by the Boston Globe.

Rashid Khalidi's new book, Brokers of Deceit, has been released.

Nishant Batsha, PhD candidate, was awarded the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans. For more information, please visit this link.

Caterina Pizzigoni has been named a Davis Center Fellow at the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University for her new project, "Special Dwellers: Saints and People in the Mexican Household, 1600-1800."

Julia del Palacio-Langer and Tobias Harper, PhD candidates, have both been chosen as winners of the 2013-14 Teaching Scholars competition for their course proposal, and have received approval from the Undergraduate Committee on Instruction. Their course proposals are as follows: "The History of Latin American Popular Culture" (del Palacio-Langer), and "Victorian Worlds: British Society, 1837-1901" (Harper).

"Welcome to Mali," an article written by Gregory Mann, is featured on Africa Is a Country.

Ira Katznelson was interviewed by The Record: "Prof. Ira Katznelson's Book Offers a New View of the New Deal."

"Is Any Hope Left for Mideast Peace?," written by Rashid Khalidi, is featured in The Opinion Pages of The New York Times.

Neslihan Senocak has been awared the I Tatti Fellowship for 2013-14 in the Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence.

Greg Mann was interviewed by Columbia News: "U.S. Engagement in Mali."

Carl Wennerlind has been featured in Columbia University's Research: "Expert in 17th Century English Economic History Sees Parallels to Today's Fiscal Crisis."

Caterina Pizzigoni was awarded the Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award. For more imformation, please see On Campus and page 4 of The Record.

Rashid Khalidi's new book Brokers of Deceit will be released March 2013.

Marco Maiuro's new book Res Caesaris has been released.

"Comprehensive Immigration Reform and the Elephant in the Room," written by Mae Ngai, is featured in Dissent.

Mae Ngai was interviewed on Democracy Now!: "Obama Offers Hope on Immigration Reform, But Emphasis on Enforcement Portends More Criminalization."

The Life Within: Local Indigenous Society in Mexico's Toluca Valley, 1650-1800 by Caterina Pizzigoni and The Earthquake Observers: Disaster Science from Lisbon to Richter by Deborah Coen were both featured on Columbia Ink: New Books By Faculty.

Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life by Barbara J. Fields and Karen Fields was reviewed in the London Review of Books.

Mae Ngai's op-ed piece on immigration reform appeared in the New York Times.

Gregory Mann was interviewed by NPR: "Latest Battle In Mali Has Deep Roots."

Hilary Hallett's new book is featured on Columbia News: "Go West, Young Women: Historian Hilary Hallett's New Perspective on Early Hollywood."

Deborah Coen's new book The Earthquake Observers has been released.

Gregory Mann's recent interview with Mediapart can be found here: "Mali: France et Etats-Unis ont aussi contribué au pourrissement."

"Mali Is Not Too Far Gone," written by Gregory Mann, is featured in The Opinion Pages of the New York Times.

Gregory Mann on Mali: Article "Pourquoi la France a eu raison d'intervenir au Mali" was featured on SlateAfrique; Article "France in Mali: the End of the Fairytale" was featured on Africa Is A Country;Video "France at War" was featured on France 24.

"Promises and Perils of Transnational History," written by Mae Ngai, is featured in the Perspectives on History.

Hilary Hallett's new book, Go West, Young Women!: The Rise of Early Hollywood has just been published by University of California Press. To get a bit of the book's flavour please see the Campaign for the American Reader.

Deborah Coen's new book The Earthquake Observers has been released.

Gregory Mann's recent interview with Mediapart can be found here: "Mali: France et Etats-Unis ont aussi contribué au pourrissement."

"Mali Is Not Too Far Gone," written by Gregory Mann, is featured in The Opinion Pages of the New York Times.

Gregory Mann on Mali: Article "Pourquoi la France a eu raison d'intervenir au Mali" was featured on SlateAfrique; Article "France in Mali: the End of the Fairytale" was featured on Africa Is A Country;Video "France at War" was featured on France 24.

"Promises and Perils of Transnational History," written by Mae Ngai, is featured in the Perspectives on History.

Hilary Hallett's new book, Go West, Young Women!: The Rise of Early Hollywood has just been published by University of California Press. To get a bit of the book's flavour please see the Campaign for the American Reader.

Samuel Roberts, Associate Professor of History, has received an additional appointment as Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health.

"The Emancipation of Abe Lincoln," written by Eric Foner, is featured in The Opinion Pages of the New York Times.

2012

"Birds: The Inner Life," written by Robert Paxton, is featured in The New York Review of Books.

Marco Maiuro has been awarded a Marie Curie  - Gerda Henkel Foundation Experienced Researchers Fellowship for 24 months of research in Germany.

Etienne Stockland, PhD student in early modern European history, has won the 2012 annual competition for best article from the journal, Annals of Science, for his essay, "'La Guerre aux Insectes': Pest Control and Agricultural Reform in the French Enlightenment."

Charles Armstrong's article "North Korea launch for domestic consumption" is featured on CNN.

Gregory Mann's article "Mali Prime Minister's Resignation Edges the Country Closer to War" is featured in the Guardian.

A review of Mark Mazower's new book Governing the World: A History of an Idea appeared in the Washington Post.

"The Horizontalists" an essay written by David Marcus, PhD candidate, has been featured in Dissent.

Marco Maiuro has been awarded a Marie Curie-Gerda Henkel Foundation Experienced Researchers Fellowship for a 24-month fully funded research stay in Germany.

"Chicken Wire and Telephone Calls: On Robert Caro's LBJ," an article written by Thomas Meaney, PhD candidate, has been featured in The Nation.

"Shelf Life," an article written by Stephen Wertheim, PhD candidate, has been featured in The Nation.

Rashid Khalidi's article "Obama's Three Options" has been featured in Foreign Policy.

Rebecca Kobrin has received the Association for Jewish Studies 2012 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award in the area of Modern Jewish History-Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania.  The Schnitzer Book Award was established in 2007 to recognize and promote outstanding scholarship in the field of Jewish Studies and to honor scholars whose work embodies the best in the field: innovative research, excellent writing, and sophisticated methodology. In selecting her book, Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora (Indiana University Press), the Prize Committee wrote:

"Rebecca Kobrin's Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora provides a fresh new perspective in its treatment of Eastern European Jewish immigration to the United States and to other lands of immigration around the globe. Viewing the process of migration through the lens of a single Eastern European Jewish community, the Polish manufacturing center of Bialystok, Kobrin helps the reader understand this great human movement in more personal terms....With her attention to transnationalism, diaspora studies, and network theory, Kobrin's work brings the fields of American and modern Jewish history into dialogue with the most current approaches in historical research and writing."

Adam Kosto's new book Documentary Culture and the Laity in the Early Middle Ages has been released.

Eric Foner's Letter to the Editor regarding "Lincoln's Use of Politics for Noble Ends" has been featured in the NYTimes's Opinion Pages.

The Department congratulates Nicholas B. Dirks, Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History, and Executive Vice President of Arts and Science, on being named the next Chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley. Columbia News and New York Times coverage.

Greg Mann's article "Mali: Military Intervention is Both Essential and Inevitable" is featured in The Guardian.

Alan Brinkley weighs in on Barack Obama's win and Election 2012. Read here: On Campus.

The World Health Organization (WHO) inaugurated the Mailman School’s Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health as a WHO Collaborating Center for Bioethics, the only such center that explicitly focuses on the ethics of public health.  Read more here.

Mark Mazower has been awarded the Dido Sotiriou Award by the Hellenic Authors' Society at a ceremony in Athens. The award, established by society in memory of writer famed Dido Sotiriou, is presented to a foreign or Greek author whose writing highlights the interaction between people and cultures through cultural diversity.

The Department of History mourns the passing of Jacques Barzun on October 25, 2012 at the age of 104.  Barzun majored in history at Columbia College, graduating as class valedictorian in 1927 at age 19. On graduation, he was immediately appointed an instructor in the history department, and in 1932 earned his Ph.D. with a thesis on Montesquieu, which he published as The French Race: Theories of Its Origins and Their Social and Political Implications, and incorporated into Race: a Study in Modern Superstition.  He became a full professor in 1945, Seth Low Professor of History in 1960, and in 1967, Barzun was appointed University Professor.  Over his long life, he authored or edited more than 30 books, including influential works of educational philosophy, historical research methodology,  literary criticism, cultural critique, and history.

The Department congratulates Susan Pedersen, who has been named the Ford Lecturer at Trinity College, Oxford, for Hilary Term 2014.  These lectures, named in honor of James Ford (1779-1851), have been held yearly since 1896.  Professor Pedersen will be the sixth female Ford Lecturer in the 118 years of the Lectures.

"The Tragedy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Hans von Dohnanyi," a piece written by Fritz Stern, Professor Emeritus, was featured in The New York Review of Books.

David Rosner and Professor Paul-André Rosental of Science-Po, Paris, have been awarded an Alliance Program grant for their project entitled, "Conference on Silicosis: Industrial and Social Origins of Disease."

Mae Ngai and Professor Riva Kastoryano of Science-Po, Paris, have been awarded an Alliance Program grant for co-teaching a graduate course,"Migration and Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe: Transnational Challenges Then and Now." The course will be offered in Spring 2014.

"The Religion of Science and Its High Priest," a review written by Thomas Meaney, PhD candidate, has been featured in The New York Review of Books. His second review "Half-Finished People" has been featured in London Revew of Books.

Barbara Fields's new book Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life has been released.

Mark Lilla's review of Charles R. Kesler's 'I Am the Change' appeared on the New York Times's Sunday Book Review.

Mark Mazower's new book Governing the World has been released, as mentioned in the Columbia Ink.

Evan Haefeli's debut on the classic Dutch children's show Het Klokhuis is coming this October 30th.  It is all about rediscovering New Amsterdam on a bright sunny day in New York.  After October 30, you can watch Evan online on www.hetklokhuis.nl or www.uitzendinggemist.nl.

Adam Kosto's new book Hostages in the Middle Ages is released.

Adam Kosto has been elected a member of the Commission Internationale de Diplomatique. More information can be found here.

"A Preventable Massacre," an article written by Seth Anziska, PhD candidate, has been featured in the NYTimes's Opinion Pages. The lead story can also be found on Le Monde.

Hilary Hallett has been awarded the Western History Association's Jensen-Miller Prize for the best article in women's and gender history.

Two alumni/ae of the Department of History's PhD program, Ansley Erickson (Asst. Prof., Columbia Teachers College) and Alex Cummings (Asst. Prof., Georgia State University), have published essays on using digital tools in historical research and publication in Writing History in the Digital Age, a born-digital, open-review volume edited by Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki.  It will be published in conventional form by Univ. of Michigan Press, but for now the open-review version is available at writinghistory.trincoll.edu.  It is an example of cutting edge, hybrid scholarly-review, open-review publishing.

Gregory Mann was featured in the article "West Africa Expert Hopes Mali Doesn't Devolve Into 'Africanistan,'" posted in Columbia News.

Rashid Khalidi's piece "America Has Shown Which Side It's On" has been featured in the NYTimes' debate Has Support for Israel Hurt U.S. Credibility?

Evan Haefeli has been awarded the Annual Hendricks Award for his latest book, New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty.

Marco Maiuro has been awarded a Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation for 2013-14, and he has also been selected as a CNRS Associate Research Fellow at the Ecole Normale Superieure for September to December 2012.

Charles Armstrong's article "The View from Pyongyang" has been featured in the NYTimes.

Kavita Sivaramakrishnan has been awarded the NSF Scholars Award, titled The Coming of Age: The Formation of the Global Science and Policy of Aging.

Pablo Piccato was interviewed on the Challenges Facing Mexico's New President.

Gregory Mann's article "Africanistan? Not Exactly" was featured in Foreign Policy.

Mae Ngai was awarded a Scholar Grant from the Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation for 2012-13 to support her project on Chinese gold miners.

Eric Foner was conferred with an honorary degree at Queen Mary, University of London, England on July 16th.

Samuel Roberts's article "Drug Wars Abroad, Prescription Pain Killers at Home" featured in HuffingtonPost.

Matt Jones has been awarded a New Directions Fellowship from the Mellon Foundation.

Caroline Bynum, Professor Emeritus, has been elected to Germany's distinguished Orden Pour Le Merite.

Ira Katznelson has been appointed President of the Social Science Research Council.

Marianne González Le Saux
was awarded the CONICYT scholarship.

Evan Haefeli's new book New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty is released.

Hollis Lynch's, Professor Emeritus of History, new book K.O. Mbadiwe: A Nigerian Political Biography, 1915-1990 is released. K.O. Mbadiwe, who received his BS in banking and finance from Columbia University in 1943, was a leading figure in Nigerian politics for more than forty years.

Neslihan Senocak's new book The Poor and the Perfect is released.

Lindsay Clarke and Krzysztof Kosmicki, two International and World History Masters students, graduate with recognition.

Casey Blake and Andrew Delbanco are awarded the James P. Shenton Awards at the DDC Annual Graduation & Awards Ceremony.

Carl Wennerlind is the recepient of the Warren Samuels Prize for "The Role of Political Economy in Hume's Moral Philosophy." He was also awarded the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) research grant and the ACLS, Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship grant to support the project "Scarcity: Historicizing the First Principle of Political Economy."

Ken Ruoff, 1997, was awarded the Frances Fuller Victor Award for General Nonfiction for Imperial Japan at its Zenith: The Wartime Celebration of the Empire's 2,600th Anniversary at the 25th Annual Oregon Book Awards Ceremony. It is also available in Japanese translation in the Asahi sensho series. The Japanese translation of Ruoff's first book, The People's Emperor: Democracy and the Japanese Monarchy, 1945-1995, which originated as his Ph.D. dissertation at Columbia University, won the major prize, Japan's equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize in 2003, the Jiro Osaragi Prize for Commentary presented annually by the Asahi Newspaper

Eric Foner will receive the GSAS Dean’s Award for Outstanding Achievement at the Ph.D. Convocation on May 13, 2012.

Melissa Borja was awarded both an ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Fellowship for 2012-2013 (accepted) and a Charlotte Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship (declined).

Rosie Bsheer was awarded both an ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Fellowship for 2012-2013 (accepted) and a Whiting Fellowship (declined).

Alice Kessler-Harris discusses her new book A Difficult Woman in the latest Columbia News article "History Professor Uses Lillian Hellman as Lens to Study 20th Century." Read the full article. The book was also reviewed by the Boston Globe on April 22, 2012. Read the full article.

Neslihan Senocak is named MacDonald Summer Fellow for 2012 by the Columbia Faculty Development Committee. Her proposal to conduct archival research in England that explores how scholarly learning became an integral part of the Roman Catholic clergy, received special recognition.

Eileen Ryan, PhD student, has been offered a tenure-track position at Temple University.

Mehmet Dosemeci, 2009 PhD graduate, has been offered a tenure-track position at Duquesne University.

Mae Ngai has been awarded a fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Manning Marable has posthumously been awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his biography of Malcolm X titled "Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention." Please visit the Pulitzer Prize website.

David Lurie has won the Lionel Trilling Award for his book Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the History of Writing.

Natasha Lightfoot has been awarded a Ford Foundation and administered by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The Ford Foundation Fellowships at the postdoctoral level are intended to identify and facilitate the academic, intellectual, and professional development of individuals who have demonstrated superior scholarship, are committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level, show promise of future achievement as scholars and teachers, and are well prepared to use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

Sarah Bridger has been awarded the Allan Nevins Prize from the Society of American Historians, a national award for the best dissertation of the past year.

Matt Jones has been awarded a 3-year Mellon New Directions grant.

Matt Jones has also been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in the Humanities (History of Science, Technology, and Economics).

Elizabeth Hinton, PhD candidate, has been offered a three-year postdoc at the University of Michigan.

Amy Offner, PhD candidate, has been offered a tenure track position in U.S. History at UPenn.

Elizabeth Blackmar is awarded a Cullman Fellowship.

Mae Ngai is awarded a Cullman Fellowship.

Pablo Piccato was awarded 2011 Alliance Faculty Joint Projects Award for "Beyond National History: State Formation in Transnational Perspective: Institutions, Political Practices and Society."

Thomas Rath, 2009 PhD graduate, has been offered tenure track position at University College, London. His faculty sponsor was Pablo Piccato.

2011

Alan Brinkley was awarded 2011's Sperber Prize for the best biography or autobiography of a journalist or major media figure.

Caroline Bynum was awarded the Haskins Medal of the Medieval Academy of America for her bookWonderful Blood:Theology and Practice in Late Medieval Northern Germany and Beyond, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007). The Haskins Medal is the most prestigious award given by the MAA and is awarded annually for a distinguished book in the field of medieval studies.

Mark C. Carnes wrote in the Chronicle of Higher Education about "Setting Students' Minds on Fire".

Andrew Delbanco – Recipient of National Humanities Medal for his insight into the American character, past and present. He has been called Americas best social critic for his essays on current issues and higher education. As a professor in American studies, he reveals how classics by Melville and Emerson have shaped our history and contemporary life.

Eric Foner received both the Pulitzer Prize in History and a Bancroft Prize for his book"The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery" (W. W. Norton & Company.

Pierre Force – Named Dean for Humanities in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

William Harris was elected as a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy.

Richard John was awarded the first Ralph Gomory book prize by the Business History Conference for his Network Nation: Inventing American Telecommunication. The Gomory Prize recognizes historical work on the effect of business enterprises on the economic conditions of a country in which they operate.

Matthew Jones – Named James R. Barker Associate Professor of Contemporary Civilization.

Alice Kessler-Harris, R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History, is the President of the Organization of American Historians.

Adam Kosto was a recipient of a multi university NEH grant for the Digging into Data Challenge. The team behind ChartEx will develop new ways of exploring the full text content of digital historical records.

Manning MarableMalcolm X: A Life of Reinvention was nominated for the National Book Award while The New York Times ranked it among the 10 Best Books of 2011.

Mark Mazower's article titled Democracy's Cradle, Rocking the World was featured in the NYTimes Opinion Pages (June 29). He was also elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Pablo Piccato's book Tyranny of Opinion: Honor in the Construction of the Mexican Public Sphere received honorary mention of Best Book in Mexican History of 2010, given by the Council of Latin American History.

Simon Schama, University Professor, was awarded 2011 Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement. The Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement is presented at a gala benefit dinner each year in New York City at the Four Seasons Restaurant. The prize honors careers of extraordinary literary achievement, recognizing writers whose influence and importance have shaped the American literary landscape. It celebrates writers for the courage of their vision, their unparalleled imagination, and for the beauty of their art. To quote the Review, "with incomparable wit and verve, Schama's penetrating essays explore how art, nature, and history illuminate contemporary culture." Professor Schama accepted the Kenyon Review award in New York City on Nov. 3 and visited Kenyon College on Nov. 5 to deliver the keynote address at the fifth annual Kenyon Review Literary Festival.

Seth Schwartz – Named Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Classical Jewish Civilization

Etienne Stockland won a prize for the best paper at the James A. Barnes Club Graduate Conference, Temple University in April 2011. He paper was entitled "Conversing with 'Stinking Carkases' and 'Illiterate Mechanicks': The Artisanal Origins of the Early Royal Society's Preservation Experiments."

Mari Webel, Post-Doc Fellow, awarded post-doctoral fellowship at Emory University in African Studies and in Global Health, Culture, and Society.

2010

Rebecca Kobrin's book Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora was a finalist for the 2010 National Jewish Book Award.

Eugenia Lean was awarded a Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship in 2010.

Susan Pedersen was among the winners of the 2010-11 Lenfest Distinguished Columbia Faculty Awards. She is the sixth winner from the History Department in the six years of the award's existence.

2009

Moshik Temkin's book The Sacco-Vanzetti Affair: America on Trial (2009: Yale UP) was a finalist for the Cundill International Prize in 2009. As of 2011, he is an inaugural Big Think Delphi Fellow. Moshik is a Columbia graduate and Assistant Profesor at Harvard University.

2007

Lisa Ford, Ph.D. in History (2007), is awarded the 2010 Littelton Griswold prize of the American Historical Association for the best work in legal history, as well as the New South Wales Premier's award for her book Settler Sovereignty.

Aline Voldoire, Ph.D. in History (2007), has been selected to receive the fifth Salo and Jeanette Baron Prize in Jewish Studies at Columbia University for her dissertation "The Transnational Politics of French and American Jews, 1860-1920."